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Relative sensitivity of an amphipod Hyalella azteca , a midge Chironomus dilutus , and a unionid mussel Lampsilis siliquoidea to a toxic sediment

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, April 2015
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3 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

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32 Mendeley
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Title
Relative sensitivity of an amphipod Hyalella azteca , a midge Chironomus dilutus , and a unionid mussel Lampsilis siliquoidea to a toxic sediment
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, April 2015
DOI 10.1002/etc.2909
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chris G. Ingersoll, James L. Kunz, Jamie P. Hughes, Ning Wang, D. Scott Ireland, David R. Mount, J. Russell Hockett, Theodore W. Valenti

Abstract

The objective of the present study was to evaluate the relative sensitivity of test organisms in exposures to dilutions of a highly toxic sediment contaminated with metals and organic compounds. One dilution series was prepared using control sand (low total organic carbon [<0.1% TOC, low binding capacity for contaminants]) and a second dilution series was prepared using control sediment from West Bearskin (WB) Lake, MN (high TOC [about 10% TOC, higher binding capacity for contaminants]). Test organisms included an amphipod (Hyalella azteca; 10-d and 28-d exposures), a midge (Chironomus dilutus; 20-d and 48-d exposures started with <1-h-old larvae or 13-d and 48-d exposures started with 7-d-old larvae), and a unionid mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea; 28-d exposures). Relative species sensitivity depended on the toxicity endpoint and the diluent. All 3 species were more sensitive in sand dilutions than in WB sediment dilutions. The <1-h-old C. dilutus were more sensitive than 7-d-old C. dilutus, but replicate variability was high in exposures started with the younger midge larvae. Larval biomass and adult emergence endpoints of C. dilutus exhibited a similar sensitivity. Survival, weight, and biomass of H. azteca were more sensitive endpoints in 28-d exposures than in 10-d exposures. Weight and biomass of L. siliquoidea were sensitive endpoints in both sand and WB sediment dilutions. Metals, ammonia, oil and other organic contaminants may have contributed to the observed toxicity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Professor 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 13 41%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 22%
Engineering 2 6%
Chemistry 2 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 April 2015.
All research outputs
#9,805,403
of 15,988,845 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#3,120
of 4,612 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#142,900
of 289,780 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#33
of 92 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,988,845 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,612 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 289,780 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 92 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.