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Human cerebrovascular function in health and disease: insights from integrative approaches

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Physiological Anthropology, February 2018
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1 tweeter
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33 Mendeley
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Title
Human cerebrovascular function in health and disease: insights from integrative approaches
Published in
Journal of Physiological Anthropology, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40101-018-0164-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erin D. Ozturk, Can Ozan Tan

Abstract

The marked increase in the size of the brain, and consequently, in neural processing capability, throughout human evolution is the basis of the higher cognitive function in humans. However, greater neural, and thus information processing capability, comes at a significant metabolic cost; despite its relatively small size, the modern human brain consumes almost a quarter of the glucose and oxygen supply in the human body. Fortunately, several vascular mechanisms ensure sufficient delivery of glucose and oxygen to the active neural tissue (neurovascular coupling), prompt removal of neural metabolic by-products (cerebral vasoreactivity), and constant global blood supply despite daily variations in perfusion pressure (cerebral autoregulation). The aim of this review is to provide an integrated overview of the available data on these vascular mechanisms and their underlying physiology. We also briefly review modern experimental approaches to assess these mechanisms in humans, and further highlight the importance of these mechanisms for humans' evolutionary success by providing examples of their healthy adaptations as well as pathophysiological alterations. Data reviewed in this paper demonstrate the importance of the cerebrovascular function to support humans' unique ability to form new and different interactions with each other and their surroundings. This highlights that there is much insight into the neural and cognitive functions that could be gleaned from interrogating the cerebrovascular function.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 27%
Researcher 7 21%
Student > Postgraduate 4 12%
Student > Master 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 5 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 33%
Neuroscience 5 15%
Psychology 3 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Sports and Recreations 1 3%
Other 5 15%
Unknown 6 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 February 2018.
All research outputs
#9,635,123
of 12,550,112 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#127
of 174 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,854
of 271,183 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#3
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,550,112 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 174 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.6. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,183 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.