↓ Skip to main content

Neonatal Exposure to Hepatitis C Virus Antigens in Uninfected Children Born to Infected Mothers

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition, January 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
5 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Neonatal Exposure to Hepatitis C Virus Antigens in Uninfected Children Born to Infected Mothers
Published in
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition, January 2018
DOI 10.1097/mpg.0000000000001755
Pubmed ID
Authors

Afrodite Psaros Einberg, Erwin Daniel Brenndörfer, Lars Frelin, Lena Hallberg, Matti Sällberg, Björn Fischler

Abstract

Vertical transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is uncommon and occurs in around 5% of births from HCV infected mothers. The reason for the low transmission rate is unclear. We aimed to investigate if there is evidence of HCV exposure also in the non-infected children born to HCV infected mothers by the presence of a detectable immune response. Serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 9 HCV vertically infected children, 32 uninfected children born to HCV infected mothers, and 15 HCV chronically infected mothers, were analyzed. HCV-RNA negative adults and children were used as controls. HCV specific T cell responses were analyzed by interferon gamma (IFN-γ) using an enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) assay and 3H-thymidine incorporation assay. HCV antibodies were also analyzed. An HCV specific T cell response was detected in 73% (11/15) of the HCV infected mothers, 67% (6/9) of the vertically infected children, 56% (18/32) of the exposed but uninfected children and in 10% and 20% of the control groups, respectively. The two groups of HCV exposed children both had a significantly higher proportion of HCV specific T cell responders compared to pediatric controls (p = 0.01 and p = 0.02). HCV specific immune responses were more common in children born to HCV infected mothers, regardless of the presence of HCV RNA. We conclude that non-infected children born to HCV infected mothers may have been exposed to HCV antigens.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 1 20%
Student > Master 1 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 20%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 20%
Unspecified 1 20%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 2 40%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 40%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 April 2018.
All research outputs
#7,089,880
of 12,781,938 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition
#1,873
of 3,432 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,305
of 270,485 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition
#35
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,781,938 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,432 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,485 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.