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Improvement of l-ornithine production by attenuation of argF in engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum S9114

Overview of attention for article published in AMB Express, February 2018
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Title
Improvement of l-ornithine production by attenuation of argF in engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum S9114
Published in
AMB Express, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13568-018-0557-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bin Zhang, Miao Yu, Ying Zhou, Bang-Ce Ye

Abstract

L-Ornithine, a non-essential amino acid, has enormous industrial applications in food, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries. Currently, L-ornithine production is focused on microorganism fermentation using Escherichia coli or Corynebacterium glutamicum. In C. glutamicum, development of high L-ornithine producing C. glutamicum was achieved by deletion of argF, but was accompanied by growth deficiency and arginine auxotrophy. L-Arginine has been routinely added to solve this problem; however, this increases production cost and causes feedback inhibition of N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase activity. To avoid the drawbacks of growth disturbance due to disruption of ArgF, strategies were adopted to attenuate its expression. Firstly, ribosome binding site substitution and start codon replacement were introduced to construct recombinant C. glutamiucm strains, which resulted in an undesirable L-ornithine production titer. Then, we inserted a terminator (rrnB) between argD and argF, which significantly improved L-ornithine production and relieved growth disturbance. Transcription analysis confirmed that a terminator can be used to downregulate expression of argF and simultaneously improve the transcriptional level of genes in front of argF. Using disparate terminators to attenuate expression of argF, an optimal strain (CO-9) with a T4 terminator produced 6.1 g/L of L-ornithine, which is 42.8% higher than that produced by strain CO-1, and is 11.2-fold higher than that of the parent CO strain. Insertion of terminators with gradient termination intensity can be a stable and powerful method to exert precise control of the expression level of argF in the development of L-ornithine producing strains, with potential applications in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 1 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 25%
Researcher 1 25%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 50%
Chemical Engineering 1 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 February 2018.
All research outputs
#10,955,436
of 13,789,144 outputs
Outputs from AMB Express
#640
of 874 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#203,388
of 271,435 outputs
Outputs of similar age from AMB Express
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,789,144 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 874 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,435 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.