↓ Skip to main content

Convergence of marine megafauna movement patterns in coastal and open oceans

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, February 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
16 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
353 tweeters
facebook
11 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
39 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
264 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Convergence of marine megafauna movement patterns in coastal and open oceans
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, February 2018
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1716137115
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. M. M. Sequeira, J. P. Rodríguez, V. M. Eguíluz, R. Harcourt, M. Hindell, D. W. Sims, C. M. Duarte, D. P. Costa, J. Fernández-Gracia, L. C. Ferreira, G. C. Hays, M. R. Heupel, M. G. Meekan, A. Aven, F. Bailleul, A. M. M. Baylis, M. L. Berumen, C. D. Braun, J. Burns, M. J. Caley, R. Campbell, R. H. Carmichael, E. Clua, L. D. Einoder, Ari Friedlaender, M. E. Goebel, S. D. Goldsworthy, C. Guinet, J. Gunn, D. Hamer, N. Hammerschlag, M. Hammill, L. A. Hückstädt, N. E. Humphries, M.-A. Lea, A. Lowther, A. Mackay, E. McHuron, J. McKenzie, L. McLeay, C. R. McMahon, K. Mengersen, M. M. C. Muelbert, A. M. Pagano, B. Page, N. Queiroz, P. W. Robinson, S. A. Shaffer, M. Shivji, G. B. Skomal, S. R. Thorrold, S. Villegas-Amtmann, M. Weise, R. Wells, B. Wetherbee, A. Wiebkin, B. Wienecke, M. Thums

Abstract

The extent of increasing anthropogenic impacts on large marine vertebrates partly depends on the animals' movement patterns. Effective conservation requires identification of the key drivers of movement including intrinsic properties and extrinsic constraints associated with the dynamic nature of the environments the animals inhabit. However, the relative importance of intrinsic versus extrinsic factors remains elusive. We analyze a global dataset of ∼2.8 million locations from >2,600 tracked individuals across 50 marine vertebrates evolutionarily separated by millions of years and using different locomotion modes (fly, swim, walk/paddle). Strikingly, movement patterns show a remarkable convergence, being strongly conserved across species and independent of body length and mass, despite these traits ranging over 10 orders of magnitude among the species studied. This represents a fundamental difference between marine and terrestrial vertebrates not previously identified, likely linked to the reduced costs of locomotion in water. Movement patterns were primarily explained by the interaction between species-specific traits and the habitat(s) they move through, resulting in complex movement patterns when moving close to coasts compared with more predictable patterns when moving in open oceans. This distinct difference may be associated with greater complexity within coastal microhabitats, highlighting a critical role of preferred habitat in shaping marine vertebrate global movements. Efforts to develop understanding of the characteristics of vertebrate movement should consider the habitat(s) through which they move to identify how movement patterns will alter with forecasted severe ocean changes, such as reduced Arctic sea ice cover, sea level rise, and declining oxygen content.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 353 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 264 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 264 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 61 23%
Researcher 55 21%
Student > Master 47 18%
Student > Bachelor 18 7%
Other 15 6%
Other 28 11%
Unknown 40 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 121 46%
Environmental Science 63 24%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 12 5%
Computer Science 2 <1%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 <1%
Other 8 3%
Unknown 56 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 343. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 November 2019.
All research outputs
#45,937
of 16,094,474 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#1,183
of 86,627 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,888
of 279,082 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#40
of 1,023 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,094,474 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 86,627 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 29.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,082 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,023 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.