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Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging for the pedunculopontine nucleus: proof of concept and histological correlation

Overview of attention for article published in Brain Structure & Function, March 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

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Title
Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging for the pedunculopontine nucleus: proof of concept and histological correlation
Published in
Brain Structure & Function, March 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00429-016-1356-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. T. D. L. Alho, C. Hamani, E. J. L. Alho, R. E. da Silva, G. A. B. Santos, R. C. Neves, L. L. Carreira, C. M. M. Araújo, G. Magalhães, D. B. Coelho, M. C. Alegro, M. G. M. Martin, L. T. Grinberg, C. A. Pasqualucci, H. Heinsen, E. T. Fonoff, E. Amaro

Abstract

The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has been proposed as target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients with postural instability and gait disorders due to its involvement in muscle tonus adjustments and control of locomotion. However, it is a deep-seated brainstem nucleus without clear imaging or electrophysiological markers. Some studies suggested that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) may help guiding electrode placement in the PPN by showing the surrounding fiber bundles, but none have provided a direct histological correlation. We investigated DTI fractional anisotropy (FA) maps from in vivo and in situ post-mortem magnetic resonance images (MRI) compared to histological evaluations for improving PPN targeting in humans. A post-mortem brain was scanned in a clinical 3T MR system in situ. Thereafter, the brain was processed with a special method ideally suited for cytoarchitectonic analyses. Also, nine volunteers had in vivo brain scanning using the same MRI protocol. Images from volunteers were compared to those obtained in the post-mortem study. FA values of the volunteers were obtained from PPN, inferior colliculus, cerebellar crossing fibers and medial lemniscus using histological data and atlas information. FA values in the PPN were significantly lower than in the surrounding white matter region and higher than in areas with predominantly gray matter. In Nissl-stained histologic sections, the PPN extended for more than 10 mm in the rostro-caudal axis being closely attached to the lateral parabrachial nucleus. Our DTI analyses and the spatial correlation with histological findings proposed a location for PPN that matched the position assigned to this nucleus in the literature. Coregistration of neuroimaging and cytoarchitectonic features can add value to help establishing functional architectonics of the PPN and facilitate neurosurgical targeting of this extended nucleus.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 31 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 22%
Unspecified 5 16%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Other 7 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 28%
Unspecified 8 25%
Neuroscience 8 25%
Psychology 2 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Other 3 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 March 2018.
All research outputs
#7,665,114
of 13,604,203 outputs
Outputs from Brain Structure & Function
#426
of 1,000 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,331
of 270,246 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brain Structure & Function
#6
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,604,203 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,000 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,246 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.