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Differential human gut microbiome assemblages during soil-transmitted helminth infections in Indonesia and Liberia

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#9 of 868)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
60 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
118 Mendeley
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Title
Differential human gut microbiome assemblages during soil-transmitted helminth infections in Indonesia and Liberia
Published in
Microbiome, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40168-018-0416-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bruce A. Rosa, Taniawati Supali, Lincoln Gankpala, Yenny Djuardi, Erliyani Sartono, Yanjiao Zhou, Kerstin Fischer, John Martin, Rahul Tyagi, Fatorma K. Bolay, Peter U. Fischer, Maria Yazdanbakhsh, Makedonka Mitreva

Abstract

The human intestine and its microbiota is the most common infection site for soil-transmitted helminths (STHs), which affect the well-being of ~ 1.5 billion people worldwide. The complex cross-kingdom interactions are not well understood. A cross-sectional analysis identified conserved microbial signatures positively or negatively associated with STH infections across Liberia and Indonesia, and longitudinal samples analysis from a double-blind randomized trial showed that the gut microbiota responds to deworming but does not transition closer to the uninfected state. The microbiomes of individuals able to self-clear the infection had more alike microbiome assemblages compared to individuals who remained infected. One bacterial taxon (Lachnospiracae) was negatively associated with infection in both countries, and 12 bacterial taxa were significantly associated with STH infection in both countries, including Olsenella (associated with reduced gut inflammation), which also significantly reduced in abundance following clearance of infection. Microbial community gene abundances were also affected by deworming. Functional categories identified as associated with STH infection included arachidonic acid metabolism; arachidonic acid is the precursor for pro-inflammatory leukotrienes that threaten helminth survival, and our findings suggest that some modulation of arachidonic acid activity in the STH-infected gut may occur through the increase of arachidonic acid metabolizing bacteria. For the first time, we identify specific members of the gut microbiome that discriminate between moderately/heavily STH-infected and non-infected states across very diverse geographical regions using two different statistical methods. We also identify microbiome-encoded biological functions associated with the STH infections, which are associated potentially with STH survival strategies, and changes in the host environment. These results provide a novel insight of the cross-kingdom interactions in the human gut ecosystem by unlocking the microbiome assemblages at taxonomic, genetic, and functional levels so that advances towards key mechanistic studies can be made.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 118 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 118 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 24%
Student > Master 18 15%
Student > Bachelor 16 14%
Researcher 12 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 4%
Other 20 17%
Unknown 19 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 28 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 18%
Immunology and Microbiology 14 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 11%
Chemistry 3 3%
Other 17 14%
Unknown 22 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 487. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2019.
All research outputs
#22,063
of 15,226,690 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#9
of 868 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,014
of 276,464 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,226,690 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 868 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 38.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,464 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them