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A cross-syndrome cohort comparison of sleep disturbance in children with Smith-Magenis syndrome, Angelman syndrome, autism spectrum disorder and tuberous sclerosis complex

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, March 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)

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1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

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35 Mendeley
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Title
A cross-syndrome cohort comparison of sleep disturbance in children with Smith-Magenis syndrome, Angelman syndrome, autism spectrum disorder and tuberous sclerosis complex
Published in
Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s11689-018-9226-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. Trickett, M. Heald, C. Oliver, C. Richards

Abstract

Sleep disturbance is common in children with neurodevelopmental disorders, with high rates identified in children with Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), Angelman syndrome (AS), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Phenotypic sleep profiles for these groups may implicate different pathways to sleep disturbance. At present, cross-group comparisons that might elucidate putative phenotypic sleep characteristics are limited by measurement differences between studies. In this study, a standardised questionnaire was administered across groups affording comparison of the prevalence and profile of sleep disturbance between groups and contrast to chronologically age-matched typically developing (TD) peers. The modified version of Simonds and Parraga's sleep questionnaire, adapted for use in children with intellectual disabilities, was employed to assess sleep disturbance profiles in children aged 2-15 years with SMS (n = 26), AS (n = 70), ASD (n = 30), TSC (n = 20) and a TD contrast group (n = 47). Associations between sleep disturbance and age, obesity, health conditions and overactivity/impulsivity were explored for each neurodevelopmental disorder group. Children with SMS displayed severe night waking (81%) and early morning waking (73%). In contrast, children with ASD experienced difficulties with sleep onset (30%) and sleep maintenance (43%). Fewer children with ASD (43%) and AS (46%) experienced severe night waking compared to children with SMS (both p < .01). Higher sleep-disordered breathing scores were identified for children with SMS (p < .001) and AS (p < .001) compared to the TD group. Sleep disturbance in children with AS and TSC was associated with poorer health. Children experiencing symptoms indicative of gastro-oesophageal reflux had significantly higher sleep-disordered breathing scores in the AS, SMS and ASD groups (all p < .01). A number of associations between overactivity, impulsivity, gastro-oesophageal reflux, age and sleep disturbance were found for certain groups. These data reveal syndrome-specific profiles of sleep disturbance. The divergent associations between sleep parameters and person characteristics, specifically symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux, overactivity and impulsivity and age, implicate aetiology-specific mechanisms underpinning sleep disturbance. The differences in prevalence, severity and mechanisms implicated in sleep disturbance between groups support a syndrome-sensitive approach to assessment and treatment of sleep disturbance in children with neurodevelopmental disorders.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 29%
Student > Master 6 17%
Unspecified 5 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Other 5 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 9 26%
Unspecified 8 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 23%
Neuroscience 4 11%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Other 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2018.
All research outputs
#1,888,599
of 13,583,786 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
#70
of 288 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#56,256
of 270,334 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,583,786 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 288 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,334 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them