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Symptom severity and its effect on health-related quality of life over time in patients with pulmonary hypertension: a multisite longitudinal cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open Respiratory Research, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
9 Mendeley
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Title
Symptom severity and its effect on health-related quality of life over time in patients with pulmonary hypertension: a multisite longitudinal cohort study
Published in
BMJ Open Respiratory Research, March 2018
DOI 10.1136/bmjresp-2017-000263
Pubmed ID
Authors

Janelle Yorke, Christi Deaton, Malcolm Campbell, Linda McGowen, Paul Sephton, David G Kiely, Iain Armstrong

Abstract

The aim of this cohort study was to examine health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and symptomatology in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and explore factors that influence its evolution over time. A prospective longitudinal multisite cohort study. Participants were recruited from specialist UK PH centres and completed a questionnaire pack at baseline, 6, 12 and 18 months to assess HRQoL (emPHasis-10), dyspnoea, fatigue, sleep, anxiety and depression. 185 patients entered the study at baseline and 126 (68%) completed month 18. At baseline, patients had significant impairment of HRQoL, anxiety, depression, dyspnoea and severe fatigue. No significant changes, apart from a reduction in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety score (P=0.04), were observed over 18 months. Depression and dyspnoea were predictors of HRQoL (P=0.002 and P=0.03, respectively). Oxygen use was also associated with diminished HRQoL and increased symptom severity. Patients with PH experience high levels of symptom severity and the negative impact on HRQoL was unchanged over time. The use of oxygen therapy, in particular, was associated with a significant impact on HRQoL. Further study of factors impacting HRQoL and interventions that target a combination of physiological and psychosocial consequences of living with PH are needed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 22%
Student > Postgraduate 2 22%
Student > Bachelor 1 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 11%
Other 1 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 67%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 11%
Unspecified 1 11%
Materials Science 1 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 March 2018.
All research outputs
#3,632,601
of 12,645,670 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open Respiratory Research
#95
of 190 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,806
of 271,405 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open Respiratory Research
#8
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,645,670 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 190 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.1. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,405 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.