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How Should Trainees Respond in Situations of Obstetric Violence?

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, March 2018
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5 news outlets
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43 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
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1 video uploader

Citations

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4 Dimensions

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71 Mendeley
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Title
How Should Trainees Respond in Situations of Obstetric Violence?
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, March 2018
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2018.20.3.ecas2-1803
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Argentina passed a law for humanized birth in 2004 and another law against obstetric violence in 2009, both of which stipulate the rights of women to achieve respectful maternity care. Clinicians and women might still be unaware of these laws, however. In this article, we discuss the case of a fourth-year medical student who, while visiting Argentina from the United States for his obstetric rotation, witnesses an act of obstetric violence. We show that the student's situation can be understood as one of moral distress and argue that, in this specific instance, it would be appropriate for the student to intervene by providing supportive care to the patient. However, we suggest that medical schools have an obligation to better prepare students for rotations conducted abroad.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 43 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 71 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 17%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Researcher 8 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 27 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 17%
Social Sciences 6 8%
Arts and Humanities 2 3%
Psychology 2 3%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 31 44%