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Influence of the Size and Curvedness of Neural Projections on the Orientationally Averaged Diffusion MR Signal

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Physics, March 2018
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Title
Influence of the Size and Curvedness of Neural Projections on the Orientationally Averaged Diffusion MR Signal
Published in
Frontiers in Physics, March 2018
DOI 10.3389/fphy.2018.00017
Pubmed ID
Authors

Özarslan, Evren, Yolcu, Cem, Herberthson, Magnus, Knutsson, Hans, Westin, Carl-Fredrik

Abstract

Neuronal and glial projections can be envisioned to be tubes of infinitesimal diameter as far as diffusion magnetic resonance (MR) measurements via clinical scanners are concerned. Recent experimental studies indicate that the decay of the orientationally-averaged signal in white-matter may be characterized by the power-law, Ē(q) ∝ q-1, where q is the wavenumber determined by the parameters of the pulsed field gradient measurements. One particular study by McKinnon et al. [1] reports a distinctively faster decay in gray-matter. Here, we assess the role of the size and curvature of the neurites and glial arborizations in these experimental findings. To this end, we studied the signal decay for diffusion along general curves at all three temporal regimes of the traditional pulsed field gradient measurements. We show that for curvy projections, employment of longer pulse durations leads to a disappearance of the q-1 decay, while such decay is robust when narrow gradient pulses are used. Thus, in clinical acquisitions, the lack of such a decay for a fibrous specimen can be seen as indicative of fibers that are curved. We note that the above discussion is valid for an intermediate range of q-values as the true asymptotic behavior of the signal decay is Ē(q) ∝ q-4 for narrow pulses (through Debye-Porod law) or steeper for longer pulses. This study is expected to provide insights for interpreting the diffusion-weighted images of the central nervous system and aid in the design of acquisition strategies.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 43%
Student > Postgraduate 1 14%
Other 1 14%
Student > Master 1 14%
Unspecified 1 14%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 2 29%
Physics and Astronomy 2 29%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 14%
Engineering 1 14%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 March 2018.
All research outputs
#8,966,607
of 11,674,646 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Physics
#200
of 400 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#181,679
of 267,446 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Physics
#18
of 29 outputs
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