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Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Chemical Ecology, January 2002
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
6 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
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Title
Published in
Journal of Chemical Ecology, January 2002
DOI 10.1023/a:1016248502927
Pubmed ID
Authors

P. C. Banko, M. L. Cipollini, G. W. Breton, E. Paulk, M. Wink, I. Izhaki

Abstract

This study describes the chemical ecology of a tritrophic interaction among species endemic to the island of Hawaii, USA: a tree (Sophora chrysophylla: mamane), an endangered bird (Loxioides bailleui; palila), and moth larvae (Cydia spp.). Palila and Cydia both specialize on the seed embryos of mamane but avoid eating the seed coats. Palila actively seek out and feed mamane embryos and Cydia larvae to their nestlings. Because mamane embryos contain potentially toxic levels of alkaloids, including broadly toxic quinolizidine alkaloids, and because insects often sequester alkaloids from their food plants, we focus on the questions of why palila forage upon mamane embryos and why they supplement their diet with Cydia larvae. Our data show that mamane embryos contain high amounts of potentially toxic alkaloids, but are well balanced nutritionally and contain lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, amino acids, and minerals at levels that are likely to be sufficient for maintenance and breeding. Mamane seed coats contain lower levels of alkaloids and nutrients, somewhat higher levels of phenolics, and much higher levels of nondigestible fiber. Taken together, these results suggest that palila have evolved tolerance to high levels of alkaloids and that they forage upon embryos primarily because of their availability in the habitat and high nutritional reward. Our data also suggest that Cydia are used by palila because they are readily accessible, nontoxic, and nutritious; the larvae apparently do not sequester alkaloids while feeding upon mamane seeds. Our results are interpreted with respect to the likelihood of current and historical coadaptive responses in this ecologically isolated and simplified island setting.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 4%
Chile 1 4%
Argentina 1 4%
Brazil 1 4%
Unknown 23 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 26%
Student > Master 6 22%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 3 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 70%
Environmental Science 3 11%
Philosophy 1 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 4%
Unknown 3 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 July 2013.
All research outputs
#3,537,405
of 12,318,771 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Chemical Ecology
#355
of 1,415 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,898
of 266,465 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Chemical Ecology
#7
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,318,771 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,415 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,465 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.