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Single-cell mass cytometry reveals distinct populations of brain myeloid cells in mouse neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration models

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Neuroscience, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
77 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
54 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
257 Mendeley
Title
Single-cell mass cytometry reveals distinct populations of brain myeloid cells in mouse neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration models
Published in
Nature Neuroscience, March 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41593-018-0100-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bahareh Ajami, Nikolay Samusik, Peter Wieghofer, Peggy P. Ho, Andrea Crotti, Zach Bjornson, Marco Prinz, Wendy J. Fantl, Garry P. Nolan, Lawrence Steinman

Abstract

Neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration may represent two poles of brain pathology. Brain myeloid cells, particularly microglia, play key roles in these conditions. We employed single-cell mass cytometry (CyTOF) to compare myeloid cell populations in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of multiple sclerosis, the R6/2 model of Huntington's disease (HD) and the mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (mSOD1) model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We identified three myeloid cell populations exclusive to the CNS and present in each disease model. Blood-derived monocytes comprised five populations and migrated to the brain in EAE, but not in HD and ALS models. Single-cell analysis resolved differences in signaling and cytokine production within similar myeloid populations in EAE compared to HD and ALS models. Moreover, these analyses highlighted α5 integrin on myeloid cells as a potential therapeutic target for neuroinflammation. Together, these findings illustrate how neuropathology may differ between inflammatory and degenerative brain disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 77 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 257 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 257 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 72 28%
Researcher 53 21%
Student > Master 34 13%
Student > Bachelor 19 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 4%
Other 39 15%
Unknown 29 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 71 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 44 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 37 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 25 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 7%
Other 30 12%
Unknown 33 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 52. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 September 2019.
All research outputs
#353,443
of 13,992,307 outputs
Outputs from Nature Neuroscience
#832
of 4,382 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,264
of 274,961 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Neuroscience
#33
of 63 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,992,307 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,382 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,961 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 63 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.