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Long-term nutrient reductions lead to the unprecedented recovery of a temperate coastal region

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
35 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
66 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
121 Mendeley
Title
Long-term nutrient reductions lead to the unprecedented recovery of a temperate coastal region
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, March 2018
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1715798115
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jonathan S. Lefcheck, Robert J. Orth, William C. Dennison, David J. Wilcox, Rebecca R. Murphy, Jennifer Keisman, Cassie Gurbisz, Michael Hannam, J. Brooke Landry, Kenneth A. Moore, Christopher J. Patrick, Jeremy Testa, Donald E. Weller, Richard A. Batiuk

Abstract

Humans strongly impact the dynamics of coastal systems, yet surprisingly few studies mechanistically link management of anthropogenic stressors and successful restoration of nearshore habitats over large spatial and temporal scales. Such examples are sorely needed to ensure the success of ecosystem restoration efforts worldwide. Here, we unite 30 consecutive years of watershed modeling, biogeochemical data, and comprehensive aerial surveys of Chesapeake Bay, United States to quantify the cascading effects of anthropogenic impacts on submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV), an ecologically and economically valuable habitat. We employ structural equation models to link land use change to higher nutrient loads, which in turn reduce SAV cover through multiple, independent pathways. We also show through our models that high biodiversity of SAV consistently promotes cover, an unexpected finding that corroborates emerging evidence from other terrestrial and marine systems. Due to sustained management actions that have reduced nitrogen concentrations in Chesapeake Bay by 23% since 1984, SAV has regained 17,000 ha to achieve its highest cover in almost half a century. Our study empirically demonstrates that nutrient reductions and biodiversity conservation are effective strategies to aid the successful recovery of degraded systems at regional scales, a finding which is highly relevant to the utility of environmental management programs worldwide.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 66 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 121 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 121 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 36 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 17%
Student > Master 16 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 10%
Unspecified 11 9%
Other 27 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 45 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 30%
Unspecified 24 20%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 11 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 3%
Other 3 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 329. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 March 2019.
All research outputs
#34,270
of 13,349,963 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#885
of 79,975 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,835
of 269,723 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#38
of 1,042 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,349,963 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,975 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,723 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,042 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.