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A sophisticated, differentiated Golgi in the ancestor of eukaryotes

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
47 tweeters

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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65 Mendeley
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Title
A sophisticated, differentiated Golgi in the ancestor of eukaryotes
Published in
BMC Biology, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12915-018-0492-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lael D. Barlow, Eva Nývltová, Maria Aguilar, Jan Tachezy, Joel B. Dacks

Abstract

The Golgi apparatus is a central meeting point for the endocytic and exocytic systems in eukaryotic cells, and the organelle's dysfunction results in human disease. Its characteristic morphology of multiple differentiated compartments organized into stacked flattened cisternae is one of the most recognizable features of modern eukaryotic cells, and yet how this is maintained is not well understood. The Golgi is also an ancient aspect of eukaryotes, but the extent and nature of its complexity in the ancestor of eukaryotes is unclear. Various proteins have roles in organizing the Golgi, chief among them being the golgins. We address Golgi evolution by analyzing genome sequences from organisms which have lost stacked cisternae as a feature of their Golgi and those that have not. Using genomics and immunomicroscopy, we first identify Golgi in the anaerobic amoeba Mastigamoeba balamuthi. We then searched 87 genomes spanning eukaryotic diversity for presence of the most prominent proteins implicated in Golgi structure, focusing on golgins. We show some candidates as animal specific and others as ancestral to eukaryotes. None of the proteins examined show a phyletic distribution that correlates with the morphology of stacked cisternae, suggesting the possibility of stacking as an emergent property. Strikingly, however, the combination of golgins conserved among diverse eukaryotes allows for the most detailed reconstruction of the organelle to date, showing a sophisticated Golgi with differentiated compartments and trafficking pathways in the common eukaryotic ancestor.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 47 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 65 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 18%
Student > Master 10 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Professor 5 8%
Other 11 17%
Unknown 14 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 22 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 34%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 2%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 15 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 43. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2019.
All research outputs
#557,200
of 16,576,001 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#136
of 1,434 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,670
of 282,655 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,576,001 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,434 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,655 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them