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Lymphnode tuberculosis in a 4-year-old boy with relapsed ganglioneuroblastoma: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2018
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Title
Lymphnode tuberculosis in a 4-year-old boy with relapsed ganglioneuroblastoma: a case report
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12879-018-3016-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karoline van de Loo, Stefan Balzer, Colin R. MacKenzie, Thomas M. Boemers, Monika Ortmann, Jörg Schaper, Arndt Borkhardt, Hans-Jürgen Laws, Michaela Kuhlen

Abstract

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) disease is a generally well-known problem among immunocompromised adults and children. In pediatric oncology, only few cases of M. tuberculosis disease are reported so far. We report a case of concomitant lymphnode tuberculosis in a 4-year-old German boy with relapsed ganglioneuroblastoma. 18 months after the initial diagnosis, relapse with new paravertebral lesions and new lesions in the left lower lobe of the lung and in the perihilar lymphnodes suspicious of metastases of the ganglioneuroblastoma were detected. While relapse in the tumor was confirmed, unexpectedly, pathologic examination revealed morphological diagnosis of lymphnode tuberculosis. The boy was of German background without previous history of tuberculosis exposure. Both, antituberculostatic and relapse treatment were immediately initiated. Three months on, MRI revealed regressive findings in the lung and lymphnodes and partial response in the tumor. The patient underwent second MiBG therapy and haploidentical stem cell transplantation. The diagnosis of lymphnode tuberculosis in a 4-year-old German boy with relapsed ganglioneuroblastoma was only made by chance, but most likely saved his life. Pediatric oncologist should be aware of tuberculosis as the incidence might increase over time and the timely diagnosis of a potentially preventable M. tuberculosis disease is irreplaceable. Further studies are needed to explore the incidence of M. tuberculosis infections and the value of IGRA, testing for latent tuberculosis infection prior to chemotherapy in children with underlying malignancies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 14%
Researcher 2 10%
Student > Master 2 10%
Librarian 2 10%
Professor 1 5%
Other 6 29%
Unknown 5 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 6 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 March 2018.
All research outputs
#12,639,286
of 15,915,455 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#4,140
of 5,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#210,627
of 280,634 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,915,455 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,796 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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