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Fungal Disease Prevention in Seedlings of Rice (Oryza sativa) and Other Grasses by Growth-Promoting Seed-Associated Endophytic Bacteria from Invasive Phragmites australis

Overview of attention for article published in Microorganisms, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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39 Mendeley
Title
Fungal Disease Prevention in Seedlings of Rice (Oryza sativa) and Other Grasses by Growth-Promoting Seed-Associated Endophytic Bacteria from Invasive Phragmites australis
Published in
Microorganisms, March 2018
DOI 10.3390/microorganisms6010021
Pubmed ID
Authors

Verma, Satish, Kingsley, Kathryn, Bergen, Marshall, Kowalski, Kurt, White, James, Satish Verma, Kathryn Kingsley, Marshall Bergen, Kurt Kowalski, James White

Abstract

Non-cultivated plants carry microbial endophytes that may be used to enhance development and disease resistance of crop species where growth-promoting and protective microbes may have been lost. During seedling establishment, seedlings may be infected by several fungal pathogens that are seed or soil borne. Several species ofFusarium,Pythiumand other water moulds cause seed rots during germination.Fusariumblights of seedlings are also very common and significantly affect seedling development. In the present study we screened nine endophytic bacteria isolated from the seeds of invasivePhragmites australisby inoculating onto rice, Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon), or annual bluegrass (Poa annua) seeds to evaluate plant growth promotion and protection from disease caused byFusarium oxysporum. We found that three bacteria belonging to genusPseudomonasspp. (SLB4-P. fluorescens, SLB6-Pseudomonassp. and SY1-Pseudomonassp.) promoted seedling development, including enhancement of root and shoot growth, and stimulation of root hair formation. These bacteria were also found to increase phosphate solubilization in in vitro experiments.Pseudomonassp. (SY1) significantly protected grass seedlings fromFusariuminfection. In co-culture experiments, strain SY1 strongly inhibited fungal pathogens with 85.71% growth inhibition ofF. oxysporum, 86.33% growth inhibition ofCurvulariasp. and 82.14% growth inhibition ofAlternariasp. Seedlings previously treated with bacteria were found much less infected byF. oxysporumin comparison to non-treated controls. On microscopic observation we found that bacteria appeared to degrade fungal mycelia actively. Metabolite products of strain SY1 in agar were also found to inhibit fungal growth on nutrient media.Pseudomonassp. (SY1) was found to produce antifungal volatiles. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification using specific primers for pyrrolnitirin synthesis and HCN (hydrogen cyanide) production suggested presence of genes for both compounds in the genome of SY1. HCN was detected in cultures of SY1. We conclude that microbes from non-cultivated plants may provide disease protection and promote growth of crop plants.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 23%
Researcher 7 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 18%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 36%
Environmental Science 5 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 10%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 9 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 March 2018.
All research outputs
#6,562,791
of 12,633,553 outputs
Outputs from Microorganisms
#119
of 309 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,915
of 273,570 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microorganisms
#9
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,633,553 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 309 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,570 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.