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Winter feeding of elk in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem and its effects on disease dynamics

Overview of attention for article published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, March 2018
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2 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

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27 Mendeley
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Title
Winter feeding of elk in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem and its effects on disease dynamics
Published in
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, March 2018
DOI 10.1098/rstb.2017.0093
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gavin G. Cotterill, Paul C. Cross, Eric K. Cole, Rebecca K. Fuda, Jared D. Rogerson, Brandon M. Scurlock, Johan T. du Toit

Abstract

Providing food to wildlife during periods when natural food is limited results in aggregations that may facilitate disease transmission. This is exemplified in western Wyoming where institutional feeding over the past century has aimed to mitigate wildlife-livestock conflict and minimize winter mortality of elk (Cervus canadensis). Here we review research across 23 winter feedgrounds where the most studied disease is brucellosis, caused by the bacteriumBrucella abortusTraditional veterinary practices (vaccination, test-and-slaughter) have thus far been unable to control this disease in elk, which can spill over to cattle. Current disease-reduction efforts are being guided by ecological research on elk movement and density, reproduction, stress, co-infections and scavengers. Given the right tools, feedgrounds could provide opportunities for adaptive management of brucellosis through regular animal testing and population-level manipulations. Our analyses of several such manipulations highlight the value of a research-management partnership guided by hypothesis testing, despite the constraints of the sociopolitical environment. However, brucellosis is now spreading in unfed elk herds, while other diseases (e.g. chronic wasting disease) are of increasing concern at feedgrounds. Therefore experimental closures of feedgrounds, reduced feeding and lower elk populations merit consideration.This article is part of the theme issue 'Anthropogenic resource subsidies and host-parasite dynamics in wildlife'.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 33%
Student > Master 6 22%
Unspecified 5 19%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 7%
Other 3 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 33%
Unspecified 8 30%
Environmental Science 3 11%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Other 2 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 March 2018.
All research outputs
#7,943,834
of 12,662,564 outputs
Outputs from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#3,967
of 4,841 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,687
of 274,201 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#73
of 86 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,662,564 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,841 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.8. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,201 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 86 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.