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Homocysteine and Hyperhomocysteinaemia

Overview of attention for article published in Current Medicinal Chemistry, August 2019
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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42 Dimensions

Readers on

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55 Mendeley
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Title
Homocysteine and Hyperhomocysteinaemia
Published in
Current Medicinal Chemistry, August 2019
DOI 10.2174/0929867325666180313105949
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bozidarka L. Zaric, Milan Obradovic, Vladan Bajic, Mohamed A. Haidara, Milos Jovanovic, Esma R. Isenovic

Abstract

Homocysteine (Hcy) is thiol group containing the amino acid, which naturally occurs in all humans. Hcy is degraded in the body through two metabolic pathways, while a minor part is excreted through kidneys. The chemical reactions that are necessary for degradation of Hcy require the presence of the folic acid, vitamins B6 and B12. Consequently, the level of the total Hcy in the serum is influenced by the presence or absence of these vitamins. An elevated level of the Hcy, hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) and homocystinuria are connected with occlusive artery disease, especially in the brain, the heart, and the kidney, in addition to venous thrombosis, chronic renal failure, megaloblastic anemia, osteoporosis, depression, Alzheimer's disease, pregnancy problems, and others. Elevated Hcy levels are connected with various pathologies both in adult and child population. Causes of HHcy include genetic mutations and enzyme deficiencies in 5, 10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) methionine synthase (MS), and cystathionine β-synthase(CβS). HHcy can be caused by deficiencies in the folate, vitamin B12 and to a lesser extent deficiency in the B6 vitamin what influences methionine metabolism. Additionally, HHcy can be caused by the rich diet and renal impairment. This review presents literature data from recent research related to Hcy metabolism and the etiology of the Hcy blood level disorder. In addition, we also described various pathological mechanisms induced by hereditary disturbances or nutritional influences and their association with HHcy induced pathology in adults and children and treatment of these metabolic disorders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 11%
Other 5 9%
Researcher 5 9%
Other 12 22%
Unknown 14 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 9%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 10 18%
Unknown 18 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 March 2021.
All research outputs
#11,721,999
of 18,034,577 outputs
Outputs from Current Medicinal Chemistry
#1,690
of 2,520 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#175,833
of 288,100 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Medicinal Chemistry
#8
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,034,577 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,520 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,100 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.