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Balancing Demand for Universally Improved Health Outcomes with Need for a Local Standard of Care

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, March 2018
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Title
Balancing Demand for Universally Improved Health Outcomes with Need for a Local Standard of Care
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, March 2018
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2018.20.3.stas1-1803
Pubmed ID
Abstract

The United States, along with other resource-rich countries, leads global health care by advancing medical care through randomized controlled trials (RCTs). While most medical research is conducted in these resource-rich areas, RCTs, including replications of previous trials, are additionally carried out in low- and middle-income countries. On the basis of positive findings from several RCTs conducted in high-income countries, the Antenatal Corticosteroids Trial (ACT) evaluated the effectiveness of antenatal corticosteroids in reducing neonatal mortality in low- and middle-income countries. ACT, however, was undertaken in dramatically different health care infrastructures and did not confirm the results of previous studies. We argue that it is neither clinically appropriate nor ethically acceptable to extrapolate findings from one region to another without accounting for the disparate cultural values, goals of care, and health services infrastructure that impact clinical outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 33%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 33%
Mathematics 1 17%
Unknown 1 17%