↓ Skip to main content

Neonatal Fc receptor is involved in the protection of fibrinogen after its intake in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, March 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Neonatal Fc receptor is involved in the protection of fibrinogen after its intake in peripheral blood mononuclear cells
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12967-018-1446-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tiziana Alberio, Greta Forlani, Marta Lualdi, Giovanna Tosi, Roberto S. Accolla, Mauro Fasano

Abstract

Fibrinogen is a central player in the blood coagulation cascade and one of the most abundant plasma proteins. This glycoprotein also triggers important events (e.g., cell spreading, the respiratory burst and degranulation) in neutrophil cells via a αMβ2 integrin-mediated binding to the cell surface. Yet, little is known about the interaction of fibrinogen with leukocytes other than neutrophils or stimulated monocytes, although high amounts of fibrinogen protein can also be found in lymphocytes, particularly in T-cells. The aim of the present work is to unveil the dynamics and the function of fibrinogen intake in T-cells. Using the Jurkat cell line as a T-cells model we performed fibrinogen intake/competition experiments. Moreover, by means of a targeted gene knock-down by RNA-interference, we investigated the dynamics of the intake mechanism. Here we show that (i) fibrinogen, although not expressed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, can be internalized by these cells; (ii) fibrinogen internalization curves show a hyperbolic behavior, which is affected by the presence of serum in the medium, (iii) FITC-conjugated fibrinogen is released and re-internalized by adjacent cells, (iv) the presence of human serum albumin (HSA) or immunoglobulin G (IgG), which are both protected from intracellular degradation by the interaction with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), results in a decreased amount of internalized fibrinogen, and (v) FcRn-knockdown affects the dynamics of fibrinogen internalization. We demonstrated here for the first time that fibrinogen can be internalized and released by T-lymphocyte cells. Moreover, we showed that the presence of serum, HSA or IgG in the culture medium results in a reduction of the amount of internalized fibrinogen in these cells. Thus, we obtained experimental evidence for the expression of FcRn in T-lymphocyte cells and we propose this receptor as involved in the protection of fibrinogen from intracellular lysosomal degradation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 36%
Lecturer 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Student > Bachelor 1 9%
Student > Master 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Unknown 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 18%
Computer Science 1 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 9%
Other 2 18%
Unknown 3 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 March 2018.
All research outputs
#7,940,661
of 12,651,470 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1,537
of 2,490 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,720
of 274,082 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,651,470 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,490 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,082 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them