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A cross-sectional study on the association between vitamin D levels and caries in the permanent dentition of Korean children

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Oral Health, March 2018
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3 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

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39 Mendeley
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Title
A cross-sectional study on the association between vitamin D levels and caries in the permanent dentition of Korean children
Published in
BMC Oral Health, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12903-018-0505-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

In-Ja Kim, Heung-Soo Lee, Hyun-Jeong Ju, Ja-Young Na, Hyo-Won Oh

Abstract

A recent study in Canada reported that vitamin D deficiency is associated with dental caries. Because Koreans have been reported to be deficient in vitamin D, we investigated the relationship between dental caries and reduced serum vitamin D levels in Korean children. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationships between blood vitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations and dental caries in the permanent dentition of Korean children. Data were collected from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey performed in 2008-2013. A total of 1688 children (10-12 years of age) were enrolled. Vitamin D intake was measured through analysis of 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] levels. Caries experience in permanent dentition was assessed using the decay-missing-filled teeth (DMFT) index and decayed-missing-filled (DMF) rate. Statistical analyses included complex samples Chi-square tests, complex samples logistic regression analyses, and Pearson's correlations. The group with 25(OH) D levels lower than 50 nmol/L had a higher proportion of children with caries in the permanent dentition and permanent first molar than the group with 25(OH)D levels of 50 nmol/L or more. When external factors, such as sex, were controlled, 25(OH)D levels were not significantly correlated with caries, but were significantly correlated with first molar caries. Children with 25(OH)D levels lower than 50 nmol/L were 1.295 times more likely to have first molar caries than those with 25(OH)D levels of 50 nmol/L or more. Additionally, 25(OH)D levels and DMFT were negatively correlated; however, the degree of correlation was not strong. The association between 25(OH)D and dental caries is still not clear. However, our findings suggested that vitamin D insufficiency may be a risk factor for dental caries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 21%
Student > Postgraduate 4 10%
Student > Master 4 10%
Unspecified 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 9 23%
Unknown 8 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 51%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Unspecified 2 5%
Mathematics 1 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 11 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 September 2018.
All research outputs
#8,057,486
of 14,553,934 outputs
Outputs from BMC Oral Health
#317
of 792 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,906
of 277,403 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Oral Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,553,934 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 792 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,403 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them