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Sherlock Holmes and the curious case of the human locomotor central pattern generator

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurophysiology, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
48 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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92 Mendeley
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Title
Sherlock Holmes and the curious case of the human locomotor central pattern generator
Published in
Journal of Neurophysiology, July 2018
DOI 10.1152/jn.00554.2017
Pubmed ID
Authors

Taryn Klarner, E. Paul Zehr

Abstract

Evidence first described in reduced animal models over 100 years ago led to deductions about the control of locomotion through spinal locomotor central pattern generating (CPG) networks. These discoveries in nature were contemporaneous with another form of deductive reasoning found in popular culture-that of Arthur Conan Doyle's detective "Sherlock Holmes". Since the invasive methods used in reduced non-human animal preparations are not amenable to study in humans, we are left instead with deducing from other measures and observations. Using the deductive reasoning approach of Sherlock Holmes as a metaphor for framing research into human CPGs, we speculate and weigh the evidence that should be observable in humans based on knowledge from other species. This review summarizes indirect inference to assess "observable evidence" of pattern generating activity which leads to the logical deduction of CPG contributions to arm and leg activity during locomotion in humans. The question of where a CPG may be housed in the human nervous system remains incompletely resolved at this time. Ongoing understanding, elaboration and application of functioning locomotor CPGs in humans is important for gait rehabilitation strategies in those with neurological injuries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 48 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 92 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 21%
Student > Bachelor 12 13%
Student > Master 8 9%
Researcher 8 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 8%
Other 25 27%
Unknown 13 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 28 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 10%
Engineering 8 9%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 13 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2019.
All research outputs
#708,163
of 16,018,042 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurophysiology
#87
of 6,048 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,606
of 281,282 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurophysiology
#1
of 105 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,018,042 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,048 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,282 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 105 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.