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Ongoing unraveling of a continental fauna: Decline and extinction of Australian mammals since European settlement

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, February 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
59 news outlets
blogs
14 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
181 tweeters
facebook
10 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
2 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
429 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
470 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Ongoing unraveling of a continental fauna: Decline and extinction of Australian mammals since European settlement
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, February 2015
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1417301112
Pubmed ID
Authors

John C. Z. Woinarski, Andrew A. Burbidge, Peter L. Harrison

Abstract

The highly distinctive and mostly endemic Australian land mammal fauna has suffered an extraordinary rate of extinction (>10% of the 273 endemic terrestrial species) over the last ∼200 y: in comparison, only one native land mammal from continental North America became extinct since European settlement. A further 21% of Australian endemic land mammal species are now assessed to be threatened, indicating that the rate of loss (of one to two extinctions per decade) is likely to continue. Australia's marine mammals have fared better overall, but status assessment for them is seriously impeded by lack of information. Much of the loss of Australian land mammal fauna (particularly in the vast deserts and tropical savannas) has been in areas that are remote from human population centers and recognized as relatively unmodified at global scale. In contrast to general patterns of extinction on other continents where the main cause is habitat loss, hunting, and impacts of human development, particularly in areas of high and increasing human population pressures, the loss of Australian land mammals is most likely due primarily to predation by introduced species, particularly the feral cat, Felis catus, and European red fox, Vulpes vulpes, and changed fire regimes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 181 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 470 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 6 1%
France 3 <1%
Spain 3 <1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Italy 3 <1%
United States 2 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 445 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 91 19%
Researcher 79 17%
Student > Master 76 16%
Student > Bachelor 72 15%
Other 33 7%
Other 72 15%
Unknown 47 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 186 40%
Environmental Science 150 32%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 3%
Social Sciences 14 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 12 3%
Other 27 6%
Unknown 66 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 702. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2021.
All research outputs
#15,400
of 17,687,978 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#526
of 89,658 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185
of 298,474 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#10
of 944 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,687,978 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 89,658 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,474 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 944 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.