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Up-regulation of miR-200 and let-7 by Natural Agents Leads to the Reversal of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition in Gemcitabine-Resistant Pancreatic Cancer Cells

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Research, August 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
patent
3 patents
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
591 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
206 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
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Title
Up-regulation of miR-200 and let-7 by Natural Agents Leads to the Reversal of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition in Gemcitabine-Resistant Pancreatic Cancer Cells
Published in
Cancer Research, August 2009
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.can-09-1298
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yiwei Li, Timothy G. VandenBoom, Dejuan Kong, Zhiwei Wang, Shadan Ali, Philip A. Philip, Fazlul H. Sarkar

Abstract

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the United States, and the aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer is in part due to its intrinsic and extrinsic drug resistance characteristics, which are also associated with the acquisition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Emerging evidence also suggests that the processes of EMT are regulated by the expression status of many microRNAs (miRNA), which are believed to function as key regulators of various biological and pathologic processes during tumor development and progression. In the present study, we compared the expression of miRNAs between gemcitabine-sensitive and gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells and investigated whether the treatment of cells with "natural agents" [3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) or isoflavone] could affect the expression of miRNAs. We found that the expression of miR-200b, miR-200c, let-7b, let-7c, let-7d, and let-7e was significantly down-regulated in gemcitabine-resistant cells, which showed EMT characteristics such as elongated fibroblastoid morphology, lower expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin, and higher expression of mesenchymal markers such as vimentin and ZEB1. Moreover, we found that reexpression of miR-200 by transfection studies or treatment of gemcitabine-resistant cells with either DIM or isoflavone resulted in the down-regulation of ZEB1, slug, and vimentin, which was consistent with morphologic reversal of EMT phenotype leading to epithelial morphology. These results provide experimental evidence, for the first time, that DIM and isoflavone could function as miRNA regulators leading to the reversal of EMT phenotype, which is likely to be important for designing novel therapies for pancreatic cancer.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 206 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 5 2%
Portugal 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 195 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 50 24%
Researcher 34 17%
Student > Master 28 14%
Student > Bachelor 24 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 5%
Other 34 17%
Unknown 26 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 60 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 50 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 42 20%
Engineering 8 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 2%
Other 12 6%
Unknown 29 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 June 2022.
All research outputs
#1,332,318
of 21,673,824 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Research
#906
of 17,461 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,556
of 324,856 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Research
#10
of 123 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,673,824 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 17,461 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 324,856 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 123 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.