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Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
117 Mendeley
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Title
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2006
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-6-10
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fabio do Amaral, MatthewJ Miller, Luís Silveira, Eldredge Bermingham, Anita Wajntal

Abstract

The family Accipitridae (hawks, eagles and Old World vultures) represents a large radiation of predatory birds with an almost global distribution, although most species of this family occur in the Neotropics. Despite great morphological and ecological diversity, the evolutionary relationships in the family have been poorly explored at all taxonomic levels. Using sequences from four mitochondrial genes (12S, ATP8, ATP6, and ND6), we reconstructed the phylogeny of the Neotropical forest hawk genus Leucopternis and most of the allied genera of Neotropical buteonines. Our goals were to infer the evolutionary relationships among species of Leucopternis, estimate their relationships to other buteonine genera, evaluate the phylogenetic significance of the white and black plumage patterns common to most Leucopternis species, and assess general patterns of diversification of the group with respect to species' affiliations with Neotropical regions and habitats.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 117 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 8 7%
Canada 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Slovakia 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Peru 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 100 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 27 23%
Student > Bachelor 18 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 9%
Student > Master 11 9%
Other 27 23%
Unknown 7 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 93 79%
Environmental Science 9 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 3%
Arts and Humanities 1 <1%
Computer Science 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 9 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 May 2019.
All research outputs
#4,663,344
of 14,990,969 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,335
of 2,657 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,031
of 286,972 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#21
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,990,969 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,657 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,972 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.