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Prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency among malaria patients in Upper Myanmar

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2018
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Title
Prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency among malaria patients in Upper Myanmar
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12879-018-3031-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jinyoung Lee, Tae Im Kim, Jung-Mi Kang, Hojong Jun, Hương Giang Lê, Thị Lam Thái, Woon-Mok Sohn, Moe Kyaw Myint, Khin Lin, Tong-Soo Kim, Byoung-Kuk Na

Abstract

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD; EC 1.1.1.49) deficiency is one of the most common X-linked recessive hereditary disorders in the world. Primaquine (PQ) has been used for radical cure of P. vivax to prevent relapse. Recently, it is also used to reduce P. falciparum gametocyte carriage to block transmission. However, PQ metabolites oxidize hemoglobin and generate excessive reactive oxygen species which can trigger acute hemolytic anemia in malaria patients with inherited G6PD deficiency. A total of 252 blood samples collected from malaria patients in Myanmar were used in this study. G6PD variant was analysed by a multiplex allele specific PCR kit, DiaPlexC™ G6PD Genotyping Kit [Asian type]. The accuracy of the multiplex allele specific PCR was confirmed by sequencing analysis. Prevalence and distribution of G6PD variants in 252 malaria patients in Myanmar were analysed. Six different types of G6PD allelic variants were identified in 50 (7 females and 43 males) malaria patients. The predominant variant was Mahidol (68%, 34/50), of which 91.2% (31/34) and 8.8% (3/34) were males and females, respectively. Other G6PD variants including Kaiping (18%, 9/50), Viangchan (6%, 3/50), Mediterranean (4%, 2/50), Union (2%, 1/50) and Canton (2%, 1/50) were also observed. Results of this study suggest that more concern for proper and safe use of PQ as a radical cure of malaria in Myanmar is needed by combining G6PD deficiency test before PQ prescription. Establishment of a follow-up system to monitor potential PQ toxicity in malaria patients who are given PQ is also required.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Student > Master 6 15%
Researcher 5 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Other 3 7%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 11 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 34%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 5%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 11 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 March 2018.
All research outputs
#11,274,815
of 12,673,944 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#4,027
of 4,712 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#236,396
of 271,784 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
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