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Challenges in Complementing Data from Ground-Based Sensors with Satellite-Derived Products to Measure Ecological Changes in Relation to Climate—Lessons from Temperate Wetland-Upland Landscapes

Overview of attention for article published in Sensors, March 2018
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  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Challenges in Complementing Data from Ground-Based Sensors with Satellite-Derived Products to Measure Ecological Changes in Relation to Climate—Lessons from Temperate Wetland-Upland Landscapes
Published in
Sensors, March 2018
DOI 10.3390/s18030880
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alisa Gallant, Walt Sadinski, Jesslyn Brown, Gabriel Senay, Mark Roth

Abstract

Assessing climate-related ecological changes across spatiotemporal scales meaningful to resource managers is challenging because no one method reliably produces essential data at both fine and broad scales. We recently confronted such challenges while integrating data from ground- and satellite-based sensors for an assessment of four wetland-rich study areas in the U.S. Midwest. We examined relations between temperature and precipitation and a set of variables measured on the ground at individual wetlands and another set measured via satellite sensors within surrounding 4 km² landscape blocks. At the block scale, we used evapotranspiration and vegetation greenness as remotely sensed proxies for water availability and to estimate seasonal photosynthetic activity. We used sensors on the ground to coincidentally measure surface-water availability and amphibian calling activity at individual wetlands within blocks. Responses of landscape blocks generally paralleled changes in conditions measured on the ground, but the latter were more dynamic, and changes in ecological conditions on the ground that were critical for biota were not always apparent in measurements of related parameters in blocks. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of decisions and assumptions we made in applying the remotely sensed data for the assessment and the value of integrating observations across scales, sensors, and disciplines.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 23%
Researcher 6 19%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Student > Master 2 6%
Professor 2 6%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 8 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 10 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Chemical Engineering 1 3%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 3%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 9 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 April 2018.
All research outputs
#3,732,606
of 13,728,145 outputs
Outputs from Sensors
#932
of 6,586 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,560
of 272,829 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sensors
#35
of 241 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,728,145 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,586 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,829 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 241 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.