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Prenatal Primary Prevention of Mental Illness by Micronutrient Supplements in Pregnancy

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Psychiatry, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
17 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
61 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
168 Mendeley
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Title
Prenatal Primary Prevention of Mental Illness by Micronutrient Supplements in Pregnancy
Published in
American Journal of Psychiatry, July 2018
DOI 10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.17070836
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert Freedman, Sharon K. Hunter, M. Camille Hoffman

Abstract

Genes, infection, malnutrition, and other factors affecting fetal brain development are a major component of risk for a child's emotional development and later mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and autism. Prenatal interventions to ameliorate that risk have yet to be established for clinical use. A systematic review of prenatal nutrients and childhood emotional development and later mental illness was performed. Randomized trials of folic acid, phosphatidylcholine, and omega-3 fatty acid supplements assess effects of doses beyond those adequate to remedy deficiencies to promote normal fetal development despite genetic and environmental risks. Folic acid to prevent neural tube defects is an example. Vitamins A and D are currently recommended at maximum levels, but women's incomplete compliance permits observational studies of their effects. Folic acid and phosphatidylcholine supplements have shown evidence for improving childhood emotional development associated with later mental illnesses. Vitamins A and D decreased the risk for schizophrenia and autism in retrospective observations. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation during early pregnancy increased the risk for schizophrenia and increased symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, but in later pregnancy it decreased childhood wheezing and premature birth. Studies are complicated by the length of time between birth and the emergence of mental illnesses like schizophrenia, compared with anomalies like facial clefts identified at birth. As part of comprehensive maternal and fetal care, prenatal nutrient interventions should be further considered as uniquely effective first steps in decreasing risk for future psychiatric and other illnesses in newborn children.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 61 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 168 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 168 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 27 16%
Student > Master 23 14%
Researcher 21 13%
Other 14 8%
Student > Postgraduate 9 5%
Other 31 18%
Unknown 43 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 23 14%
Psychology 19 11%
Neuroscience 14 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 5%
Other 20 12%
Unknown 48 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 172. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 November 2020.
All research outputs
#116,430
of 16,255,167 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Psychiatry
#105
of 6,352 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,303
of 283,236 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Psychiatry
#4
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,255,167 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,352 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,236 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.