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Intraspecific Niche Models for Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa) Suggest Potential Variability in Population-Level Response to Climate Change

Overview of attention for article published in Systematic Biology, March 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters

Citations

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21 Dimensions

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47 Mendeley
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Title
Intraspecific Niche Models for Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa) Suggest Potential Variability in Population-Level Response to Climate Change
Published in
Systematic Biology, March 2018
DOI 10.1093/sysbio/syy017
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kaitlin C Maguire, Douglas J Shinneman, Kevin M Potter, Valerie D Hipkins

Abstract

Unique responses to climate change can occur across intraspecific levels, resulting in individualistic adaptation or movement patterns among populations within a given species. Thus, the need to model potential responses among genetically distinct populations within a species is increasingly recognized. However, predictive models of future distributions are regularly fit at the species level, often because intraspecific variation is unknown or is identified only within limited sample locations. In this study, we considered the role of intraspecific variation to shape the geographic distribution of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), an ecologically and economically important tree species in North America. Morphological and genetic variation across the distribution of ponderosa pine suggest the need to model intraspecific populations: the two varieties (var. ponderosa and var. scopulorum) and several haplotype groups within each variety have been shown to occupy unique climatic niches, suggesting populations have distinct evolutionary lineages adapted to different environmental conditions. We utilized a recently-available, geographically-widespread dataset of intraspecific variation (haplotypes) for ponderosa pine and a recently-devised lineage distance modeling approach to derive additional, likely intraspecific occurrence locations. We confirmed the relative uniqueness of each haplotype-climate relationship using a niche-overlap analysis, and developed ecological niche models (ENMs) to project the distribution for two varieties and eight haplotypes under future climate forecasts. Future projections of haplotype niche distributions generally revealed greater potential range loss than predicted for the varieties. This difference may reflect intraspecific responses of distinct evolutionary lineages. However, directional trends are generally consistent across intraspecific levels, and include a loss of distributional area and an upward shift in elevation. Our results demonstrate the utility in modeling intraspecific response to changing climate and they inform management and conservation strategies, by identifying haplotypes and geographic areas that may be most at risk, or most secure, under projected climate change.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 21%
Student > Master 8 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 10 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 30%
Environmental Science 13 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 9%
Unspecified 1 2%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 11 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2018.
All research outputs
#4,321,287
of 22,154,328 outputs
Outputs from Systematic Biology
#611
of 1,580 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,678
of 300,610 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Systematic Biology
#19
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,154,328 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,580 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,610 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.