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Personality and the collective: bold homing pigeons occupy higher leadership ranks in flocks

Overview of attention for article published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
17 tweeters
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
102 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Personality and the collective: bold homing pigeons occupy higher leadership ranks in flocks
Published in
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, March 2018
DOI 10.1098/rstb.2017.0038
Pubmed ID
Authors

Takao Sasaki, Richard P. Mann, Katherine N. Warren, Tristian Herbert, Tara Wilson, Dora Biro

Abstract

While collective movement is ecologically widespread and conveys numerous benefits on individuals, it also poses a coordination problem: who controls the group's movements? The role that animal 'personalities' play in this question has recently become a focus of research interest. Although many animal groups have distributed leadership (i.e. multiple individuals influence collective decisions), studies linking personality and leadership have focused predominantly on the group's single most influential individual. In this study, we investigate the relationship between personality and the influence of multiple leaders on collective movement using homing pigeons,Columba livia, a species known to display complex multilevel leadership hierarchies during flock flights. Our results show that more exploratory (i.e. 'bold') birds are more likely to occupy higher ranks in the leadership hierarchy and thus have more influence on the direction of collective movement than less exploratory (i.e. 'shy') birds during both free flights around their lofts and homing flights from a distant site. Our data also show that bold pigeons fly faster than shy birds during solo flights. We discuss our results in light of theories about the evolution of personality, with specific reference to the adaptive value of heterogeneity in animal groups.This article is part of the theme issue 'Collective movement ecology'.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 102 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 102 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 24%
Student > Bachelor 19 19%
Student > Master 16 16%
Researcher 9 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 5%
Other 11 11%
Unknown 18 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 48 47%
Environmental Science 9 9%
Psychology 4 4%
Computer Science 2 2%
Social Sciences 2 2%
Other 12 12%
Unknown 25 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 March 2021.
All research outputs
#2,266,473
of 18,829,177 outputs
Outputs from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#1,924
of 5,726 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,111
of 290,898 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#46
of 105 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,829,177 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,726 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,898 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 105 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.