↓ Skip to main content

Changes in the perceived quality of primary care in Shanghai and Shenzhen, China: a difference-in-difference analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Bulletin of the World Health Organization, April 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
66 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Changes in the perceived quality of primary care in Shanghai and Shenzhen, China: a difference-in-difference analysis
Published in
Bulletin of the World Health Organization, April 2015
DOI 10.2471/blt.14.139527
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xiaolin Wei, Haitao Li, Nan Yang, Samuel YS Wong, Marc CS Chong, Leiyu Shi, Martin CS Wong, Jianguang Xu, Dan Zhang, Jinling Tang, Donald KT Li, Qingyue Meng, Sian M Griffiths

Abstract

To assess changes in the quality of primary care in two megacities following the introduction of health system reforms in China. We conducted multistage stratified random face-to-face surveys of patients visiting community health centres in Shanghai in 2011 and 2013, and Shenzhen in 2012 and 2013. Quality of primary care was measured using an assessment tool. Difference-in-difference analyses based on multiple linear regressions were used to compare the changes over time, after controlling for potential confounders. Most (2721) of the 3214 participants used a community health centre as their regular source of care and were included in our analyses. The mean total scores for quality of primary care were similar for Shanghai and Shenzhen at baseline. In Shenzhen, the mean total scores for all participants and those on low incomes had worsened by 0.922 (95% CI: 0.629 to 1.215) and 1.203 (95% CI: 0.397 to 2.009), respectively. In Shanghai, however, there were improvements in the mean total scores which included increases in the scores for first-contact utilization, continuity, coordination of information and comprehensiveness. The quality of primary care improved in Shanghai but not in Shenzhen. This may be because, in Shanghai, beneficial long-term relationships between patients and general practitioners were supported by capitation payments and the provision of services tailored to the local health priorities.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 2%
Unknown 65 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 15%
Student > Master 9 14%
Researcher 6 9%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 15 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 18%
Social Sciences 7 11%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 3%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 20 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2015.
All research outputs
#4,467,114
of 14,572,140 outputs
Outputs from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#1,332
of 2,667 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,007
of 276,148 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#41
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,572,140 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,667 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.9. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,148 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.