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Tuberculosis control and economic recession: longitudinal study of data from 21 European countries, 1991–2012

Overview of attention for article published in Bulletin of the World Health Organization, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
66 Mendeley
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Title
Tuberculosis control and economic recession: longitudinal study of data from 21 European countries, 1991–2012
Published in
Bulletin of the World Health Organization, April 2015
DOI 10.2471/blt.14.142356
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aaron Reeves, Sanjay Basu, Martin McKee, Andreas Sandgren, David Stuckler, Jan C Semenza

Abstract

To investigate whether the economic recession affected the control of tuberculosis in the European Union. Multivariate regression models were used to quantify the association between gross domestic product, public health expenditure and tuberculosis case detection rates, using data from 21 European Union member states (1991-2012). The estimated changes in case detection attributable to the recession were combined with mathematical models of tuberculosis transmission, to project the potential influence of the recession on tuberculosis epidemiology until 2030. Between 1991 and 2007, detection rates for sputum-smear-positive tuberculosis in the European Union were stable at approximately 85%. During the economic recession (2008-2011) detection rates declined by a mean of 5.22% (95% confidence interval, CI: 2.54-7.90) but treatment success rates showed no significant change (P = 0.62). A fall in economic output of 100 United States dollars per capita was associated with a 0.22% (95% CI: 0.05-0.39) mean reduction in the tuberculosis case detection rate. An equivalent fall in spending on public health services was associated with a 2.74% (95% CI: 0.31-5.16) mean reduction in the detection rate. Mathematical models suggest that the recession and consequent austerity policies will lead to increases in tuberculosis prevalence and tuberculosis-attributable mortality that are projected to persist for over a decade. Across the European Union, reductions in spending on public health services appear to have reduced tuberculosis case detection and to have increased the long-term risk of a resurgence in the disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 62 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 20%
Researcher 10 15%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 11%
Other 4 6%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 15 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 35%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 21 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 May 2021.
All research outputs
#6,422,252
of 21,260,632 outputs
Outputs from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#1,991
of 4,289 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#109,731
of 297,683 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#42
of 64 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,260,632 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,289 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 297,683 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 64 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.