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Personality traits and career choices among physicians in Finland: employment sector, clinical patient contact, specialty and change of specialty

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, March 2018
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Title
Personality traits and career choices among physicians in Finland: employment sector, clinical patient contact, specialty and change of specialty
Published in
BMC Medical Education, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12909-018-1155-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sari Mullola, Christian Hakulinen, Justin Presseau, David Gimeno Ruiz de Porras, Markus Jokela, Taina Hintsa, Marko Elovainio

Abstract

Personality influences an individual's adaptation to a specific job or organization. Little is known about personality trait differences between medical career and specialty choices after graduating from medical school when actually practicing different medical specialties. Moreover, whether personality traits contribute to important career choices such as choosing to work in the private or public sector or with clinical patient contact, as well as change of specialty, have remained largely unexplored. In a nationally representative sample of Finnish physicians (N = 2837) we examined how personality traits are associated with medical career choices after graduating from medical school, in terms of employment sector, patient contact, medical specialty and change of specialty. Personality was assessed using the shortened version of the Big Five Inventory (S-BFI). An analysis of covariance with posthoc tests for pairwise comparisons was conducted, adjusted for gender and age with confounders (employment sector, clinical patient contact and medical specialty). Higher openness was associated with working in the private sector, specializing in psychiatry, changing specialty and not practicing with patients. Lower openness was associated with a high amount of patient contact and specializing in general practice as well as ophthalmology and otorhinolaryngology. Higher conscientiousness was associated with a high amount of patient contact and specializing in surgery and other internal medicine specialties. Lower conscientiousness was associated with specializing in psychiatry and hospital service specialties. Higher agreeableness was associated with working in the private sector and specializing in general practice and occupational health. Lower agreeableness and neuroticism were associated with specializing in surgery. Higher extraversion was associated with specializing in pediatrics and change of specialty. Lower extraversion was associated with not practicing with patients. The results showed distinctive personality traits to be associated with physicians' career and specialty choices after medical school independent of known confounding factors. Openness was the most consistent personality trait associated with physicians' career choices in terms of employment sector, amount of clinical patient contact, specialty choice and change of specialty. Personality-conscious medical career counseling and career guidance during and after medical education might enhance the person-job fit among physicians.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 78 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 12%
Student > Master 8 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 10%
Researcher 7 9%
Other 20 26%
Unknown 16 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 32%
Psychology 10 13%
Business, Management and Accounting 5 6%
Social Sciences 4 5%
Arts and Humanities 2 3%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 24 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 February 2020.
All research outputs
#11,052,734
of 17,100,199 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#1,675
of 2,405 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#173,922
of 286,218 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,100,199 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,405 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,218 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them