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The Voice of the Child in Social Work Assessments: Age-Appropriate Communication with Children

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Social Work, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
17 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
117 Mendeley
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Title
The Voice of the Child in Social Work Assessments: Age-Appropriate Communication with Children
Published in
British Journal of Social Work, May 2015
DOI 10.1093/bjsw/bcv040
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lisa O'Reilly, Pat Dolan

Abstract

This article describes a child-centred method for engaging with children involved in the child protection and welfare system. One of the primary arguments underpinning this research is that social workers need to be skilled communicators to engage with children about deeply personal and painful issues. There is a wide range of research that maintains play is the language of children and the most effective way to learn about children is through their play. Considering this, the overarching aim of this study was to investigate the role of play skills in supporting communication between children and social workers during child protection and welfare assessments. The data collection was designed to establish the thoughts and/or experiences of participants in relation to a Play Skills Training (PST) programme designed by the authors. The key findings of the study reveal that the majority of social work participants rate the use of play skills in social work assessments as a key factor to effective engagement with children. Of particular importance, these messages address how social work services can ensure in a child-centred manner that the voice of children is heard and represented in all assessments of their well-being and future care options.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 117 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ireland 2 2%
Unknown 115 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 24%
Student > Bachelor 20 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 13%
Researcher 10 9%
Student > Postgraduate 7 6%
Other 23 20%
Unknown 14 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 68 58%
Psychology 15 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 8%
Arts and Humanities 6 5%
Unspecified 1 <1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 16 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 May 2019.
All research outputs
#1,221,322
of 15,922,988 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Social Work
#131
of 1,524 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,824
of 281,102 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Social Work
#2
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,988 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,524 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,102 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.