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Lasiopodomys fuscus as an important intermediate host for Echinococcus multilocularis: isolation and phylogenetic identification of the parasite

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, March 2018
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Title
Lasiopodomys fuscus as an important intermediate host for Echinococcus multilocularis: isolation and phylogenetic identification of the parasite
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40249-018-0409-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qi-Gang Cai, Xiu-Min Han, Yong-Hai Yang, Xue-Yong Zhang, Li-Qing Ma, Panagiotis Karanis, Yong-Hao Hu

Abstract

Echinococcus multilocularis causes alveolar echinococcosis (AE) and is widely prevalent in Qinghai Province, China, where a number of different species have been identified as hosts. However, limited information is available on the Qinghai vole (Lasiopodomys fuscus), which is hyper endemic to Qinghai Province and may represent a potential intermediate host of E. multilocularis. Thus, L. fuscus could contribute to the endemicity of AE in the area. Fifty Qinghai voles were captured from Jigzhi County in Qinghai Province for the clinical identification of E. multilocularis infection via anatomical examination. Hydatid fluid was collected from vesicles of the livers in suspected voles and subjected to a microscopic examination and PCR assay based on the barcoding gene of cox 1. PCR-amplified segments were sequenced for a phylogenetic analysis. E. multilocularis-infected Qinghai voles were morphologically identified and subjected to a phylogenetic analysis to confirm their identities. Seventeen of the 50 Qinghai voles had E. multilocularis-infection-like vesicles in their livers. Eleven out of the 17 Qinghai voles presented E. multilocularis infection, which was detected by PCR and sequencing. The phylogenetic analysis showed that all 11 positive samples belonged to the E. multilocularis Asian genotype. A morphological identification and phylogenetic analysis of the E. multilocularis-infected Qinghai voles confirmed that all captured animals were L. fuscus. L. fuscus can be infected with E. multilocularis and plays a potential role in the life cycle and epidemiology of E. multilocularis in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau of China.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 17%
Student > Postgraduate 1 17%
Student > Master 1 17%
Unknown 1 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 17%
Unknown 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2018.
All research outputs
#11,332,323
of 12,739,396 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#394
of 442 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#238,213
of 273,872 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#11
of 12 outputs
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