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China, the United States, and competition for resources that enable emerging technologies

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
24 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
Title
China, the United States, and competition for resources that enable emerging technologies
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2018
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1717152115
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew L. Gulley, Nedal T. Nassar, Sean Xun

Abstract

Historically, resource conflicts have often centered on fuel minerals (particularly oil). Future resource conflicts may, however, focus more on competition for nonfuel minerals that enable emerging technologies. Whether it is rhenium in jet engines, indium in flat panel displays, or gallium in smart phones, obscure elements empower smarter, smaller, and faster technologies, and nations seek stable supplies of these and other nonfuel minerals for their industries. No nation has all of the resources it needs domestically. International trade may lead to international competition for these resources if supplies are deemed at risk or insufficient to satisfy growing demand, especially for minerals used in technologies important to economic development and national security. Here, we compare the net import reliance of China and the United States to inform mineral resource competition and foreign supply risk. Our analysis indicates that China relies on imports for over half of its consumption for 19 of 42 nonfuel minerals, compared with 24 for the United States-11 of which are common to both. It is for these 11 nonfuel minerals that competition between the United States and China may become the most contentious, especially for those with highly concentrated production that prove irreplaceable in pivotal emerging technologies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 24 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 38%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 18%
Student > Master 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Other 7 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 6 18%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 12%
Chemistry 4 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 12%
Unspecified 4 12%
Other 12 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 44. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2018.
All research outputs
#334,579
of 12,450,417 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#7,294
of 77,707 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,138
of 272,157 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#320
of 1,011 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,450,417 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 77,707 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,157 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,011 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.