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In vitro bioassays reveal that additives are significant contributors to the toxicity of commercial household pesticides

Overview of attention for article published in Aquatic Toxicology, June 2018
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Title
In vitro bioassays reveal that additives are significant contributors to the toxicity of commercial household pesticides
Published in
Aquatic Toxicology, June 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.aquatox.2018.03.033
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jason P. van de Merwe, Peta A. Neale, Steven D. Melvin, Frederic D.L. Leusch

Abstract

Pesticides commonly used around households can contain additives of unknown concentrations and toxicity. Given the likelihood of these chemicals washing into urban waterways, it is important to understand the effects that these additives may have on aquatic organisms. The aim of this study was to compare the toxicity of commercially available household pesticides to that of the active ingredient(s) alone. The toxicity of five household pesticides (three herbicides and two insecticides) was investigated using a bacterial cytotoxicity bioassay and an algal photosynthesis bioassay. The commercial products were up to an order of magnitude more toxic than the active ingredient(s) alone. In addition, two commercial products with the same listed active ingredients in the same ratio had a 600× difference in potency. These results clearly demonstrate that additives in commercial formulations are significant contributors to the toxicity of household pesticides. The toxicity of pesticides in aquatic systems is therefore likely underestimated by conventional chemical monitoring and risk assessment when only the active ingredients are considered. Regulators and customers should require more clarity from pesticide manufacturers about the nature and concentrations of not only the active ingredients, but also additives used in commercial formulations. In addition, monitoring programmes and chemical risk assessments schemes should develop a structured approach to assessing the toxic effects of commercial formulations, including additives, rather than simply those of the listed active ingredients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 36%
Lecturer 2 14%
Unspecified 2 14%
Student > Bachelor 1 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 3 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 6 43%
Environmental Science 3 21%
Engineering 2 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 14%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 7%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 April 2018.
All research outputs
#10,875,056
of 12,270,712 outputs
Outputs from Aquatic Toxicology
#1,133
of 1,397 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#229,253
of 269,601 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Aquatic Toxicology
#67
of 67 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,270,712 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,397 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,601 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 67 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.