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Fatal swine acute diarrhoea syndrome caused by an HKU2-related coronavirus of bat origin

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
76 news outlets
blogs
13 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
995 tweeters
facebook
9 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
reddit
1 Redditor
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

dimensions_citation
208 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
504 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Fatal swine acute diarrhoea syndrome caused by an HKU2-related coronavirus of bat origin
Published in
Nature, April 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41586-018-0010-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peng Zhou, Hang Fan, Tian Lan, Xing-Lou Yang, Wei-Feng Shi, Wei Zhang, Yan Zhu, Ya-Wei Zhang, Qing-Mei Xie, Shailendra Mani, Xiao-Shuang Zheng, Bei Li, Jin-Man Li, Hua Guo, Guang-Qian Pei, Xiao-Ping An, Jun-Wei Chen, Ling Zhou, Kai-Jie Mai, Zi-Xian Wu, Di Li, Danielle E. Anderson, Li-Biao Zhang, Shi-Yue Li, Zhi-Qiang Mi, Tong-Tong He, Feng Cong, Peng-Ju Guo, Ren Huang, Yun Luo, Xiang-Ling Liu, Jing Chen, Yong Huang, Qiang Sun, Xiang-Li-Lan Zhang, Yuan-Yuan Wang, Shao-Zhen Xing, Yan-Shan Chen, Yuan Sun, Juan Li, Peter Daszak, Lin-Fa Wang, Zheng-Li Shi, Yi-Gang Tong, Jing-Yun Ma

Abstract

Cross-species transmission of viruses from wildlife animal reservoirs poses a marked threat to human and animal health1. Bats have been recognized as one of the most important reservoirs for emerging viruses and the transmission of a coronavirus that originated in bats to humans via intermediate hosts was responsible for the high-impact emerging zoonosis, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)2-10. Here we provide virological, epidemiological, evolutionary and experimental evidence that a novel HKU2-related bat coronavirus, swine acute diarrhoea syndrome coronavirus (SADS-CoV), is the aetiological agent that was responsible for a large-scale outbreak of fatal disease in pigs in China that has caused the death of 24,693 piglets across four farms. Notably, the outbreak began in Guangdong province in the vicinity of the origin of the SARS pandemic. Furthermore, we identified SADS-related CoVs with 96-98% sequence identity in 9.8% (58 out of 591) of anal swabs collected from bats in Guangdong province during 2013-2016, predominantly in horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus spp.) that are known reservoirs of SARS-related CoVs. We found that there were striking similarities between the SADS and SARS outbreaks in geographical, temporal, ecological and aetiological settings. This study highlights the importance of identifying coronavirus diversity and distribution in bats to mitigate future outbreaks that could threaten livestock, public health and economic growth.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 995 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 504 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 504 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 100 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 73 14%
Student > Master 71 14%
Other 39 8%
Student > Bachelor 32 6%
Other 98 19%
Unknown 91 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 64 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 52 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 49 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 42 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 32 6%
Other 141 28%
Unknown 124 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1300. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 October 2020.
All research outputs
#4,033
of 16,072,043 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#574
of 76,322 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#154
of 281,468 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#24
of 979 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,072,043 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 76,322 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 86.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,468 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 979 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.