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Measurement properties of the Nepali version of the Connor Davidson resilience scales in individuals with chronic pain

Overview of attention for article published in Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, April 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#48 of 1,751)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)

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1 blog
twitter
16 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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11 Dimensions

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48 Mendeley
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Title
Measurement properties of the Nepali version of the Connor Davidson resilience scales in individuals with chronic pain
Published in
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12955-018-0884-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Saurab Sharma, Anupa Pathak, J. Haxby Abbott, Mark P. Jensen

Abstract

Resilience is an individual's ability to recover or "bounce back" from stressful events. It is commonly identified as a protective factor against psychological dysfunctions in wide range of clinical conditions including chronic pain. Resilience is commonly assessed using the Connor Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the CD-RISC into Nepali will allow for a deeper understanding of resilience as an important domain in health in Nepal, and will allow for cross-cultural comparison with other cultures. Therefore, the aims of the study were to translate and culturally adapt 10- and 2-item versions of the CD-RISC into Nepali and evaluate their psychometric properties. After translating the measures, we performed exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the 10-item version in two independent samples (ns = 131 and 134) of individuals with chronic pain. We then evaluated the internal consistency, test-retest stability, and construct validity of the 10- and 2-item measures in these samples. We also evaluated the internal consistency, and the construct and concurrent validity of the 2-item version in an additional sample of 140 individuals. The results supported a single factor model for the 10-item measure; this measure also evidenced good to excellent internal consistency and excellent test-retest stability. Construct validity was supported via moderate associations with pain catastrophizing. The internal consistency of 2-item version was marginal, although construct validity was supported via weak to moderate associations with measures of pain catastrophizing, depression and anxiety, and concurrent validity was supported by strong association with the 10-item CD-RISC scale. The findings support the reliability and validity of the 10-item Nepali version of the CD-RISC, and use of the 2-item version in survey studies in individuals with chronic pain. The availability of these translated measures will allow for cross-cultural comparisons of resilience in samples of individuals with chronic pain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Researcher 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 13 27%
Unknown 13 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 15%
Psychology 3 6%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Arts and Humanities 2 4%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 19 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 March 2020.
All research outputs
#1,013,512
of 15,928,138 outputs
Outputs from Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
#48
of 1,751 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,359
of 280,887 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,928,138 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,751 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,887 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them