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eFAST for the diagnosis of a perioperative complication during percutaneous nephrolithotomy

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Ultrasound Journal, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#48 of 173)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
18 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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8 Mendeley
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Title
eFAST for the diagnosis of a perioperative complication during percutaneous nephrolithotomy
Published in
Critical Ultrasound Journal, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13089-018-0088-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Achyut Sharma, Prajjwal Bhattarai, Apurb Sharma

Abstract

A 29-year-old patient with normal preanesthetic evaluation was planned for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for right nephrolithiasis with right pyelolithiasis. Surgery was performed under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation with muscle relaxation. At the conclusion of surgery, when the patient was turned over to supine position, tense abdomen was noted. Immediately extended focused assessment with sonography in trauma (eFAST) was done in which both right and left quadrants of abdomen including pericardial and suprapubic region, right and left thoracic, and both lung basis were examined. Fluid collection was seen in Morison's pouch which was drained by the urologist under real-time ultrasonography guidance by anesthesiologist. Distension of abdomen subsequently subsided and patient had normal vitals. Trachea was extubated and patient shifted to post-operative ward. eFAST and FAST scans are routine procedures in the rapid assessment of trauma victims in emergency settings. The fluid extravasation during a routine PCNL procedure may lead to abdominal compartment syndrome. This case demonstrated that use of eFAST rapidly detected abdominal collection and ruled out life-threatening conditions such as hemothorax and pneumothorax and prevented abdominal compartment syndrome. Our case is only an example that potentially lethal conditions like these may be encountered in the perioperative setting and the knowledge of eFAST scan may be of great help.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 3 38%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 25%
Researcher 1 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 13%
Unknown 1 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 63%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 13%
Unspecified 1 13%
Unknown 1 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2018.
All research outputs
#1,055,423
of 12,942,450 outputs
Outputs from Critical Ultrasound Journal
#48
of 173 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,948
of 269,516 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Ultrasound Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,942,450 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 173 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,516 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them