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Quantifying malaria endemicity in Ethiopia through combined application of classical methods and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay: an initial step for countries with low transmission initiating…

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, April 2018
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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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4 Dimensions

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29 Mendeley
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Title
Quantifying malaria endemicity in Ethiopia through combined application of classical methods and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay: an initial step for countries with low transmission initiating elimination programme
Published in
Malaria Journal, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2282-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zewdie Birhanu, Yemane Ye-ebiyo Yihdego, Delenasaw Yewhalaw

Abstract

In the context of reduced transmission of malaria, it is essential to re-evaluate and determine the level of transmission as it guides re-orientation of control measures which is appropriate to local disease epidemiology. However, little is known about level of malaria transmission in Ethiopia. The present study aimed to investigate the level of malaria transmission through combined application of classical methods and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA) in low transmission settings of Ethiopia. This study was conducted in June 2016 on 763 apparently healthy children 2-9 years of age. Children were recruited from ten sites representing different malaria transmission settings in Ethiopia. Splenomegaly rate, infection rate and EIA antibody test were used to determine endemicity. The data were analysed using SPSS 21.0 and Stata 12.0. The overall prevalence of malaria parasitaemia was 2.49% (95% CI 1.38-3.59) and 2.36% (95% CI 1.28-3.44) as detected using rapid diagnostic test and microscopy, respectively. Plasmodium falciparum accounted for 62.63% of the infections. The prevalence of parasitaemia significantly varied by altitude and localities; the highest (5.8%) in areas below 1500 m above sea level. Overall, splenomegaly rate was 1.70% (95% CI 0.78-0.2.66%), making the overall malaria transmission hypoendemic. Infection rate was higher among males (2.7%), but rate of splenomegaly was higher in females. Incongruent with spleen rate and parasitaemia, EIA showed a higher level of cumulative exposure to malaria with spatially localized and highly heterogeneous transmission. Overall, 126 (18.75%, 95% CI 15.79-21.71) of the children were positive for total malaria antibodies with significant variations with altitude, age and sex; the higher in areas of < 1500 m asl (25.8%), children ≥ 5 years (22.1%) and among males (20.9%). Splenomegaly and parasitaemia are not good measures to show variations in the levels of malaria transmission in reduced and/or low endemic settings. The malaria antibody (i.e. serological) test seems to be a good measure of malaria endemicity showing greater degree of heterogeneity and localized risk of transmission. Thus, malaria elimination efforts need to be supported with serological indicators to identify patterns of foci of transmission to set priorities for interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 21%
Researcher 4 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Other 6 21%
Unknown 6 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 7%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 6 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 August 2018.
All research outputs
#7,701,688
of 13,376,849 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,582
of 3,902 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,033
of 270,825 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,376,849 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,902 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,825 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them