↓ Skip to main content

Association between age and outpatient clinic arrival time: myth or reality?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, April 2018
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Readers on

mendeley
12 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Association between age and outpatient clinic arrival time: myth or reality?
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-3057-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kashif Waqar Faiz, Espen Saxhaug Kristoffersen

Abstract

Non-attendance and late arrivals diminish patient flow in outpatient clinics. On the other hand, patient earliness may also be undesirable. Physicians often experience that older patients are more punctual than younger patients, and often they come excessively early. The aim of this study was to determine whether an association between age and outpatient clinic arrival time could be established or not, i.e. to find out if it is a myth or a reality. Prospective descriptive study performed at a neurological outpatient clinic. Data were collected from all scheduled appointments during an eight-week period. Variables included were age, gender, appointment time, arrival time, no-shows, appointment type, need for assistance and if it was an early or late appointment. Outcomes were unpunctuality (early and late arrivals) and non-attendance. Of 1353 appointments, non-attendance rate was 9.5 and 5.1% were late arrivals. Median age increased with increased patient earliness (p <  0.001). Younger age (p = 0.007) and new referrals (p = 0.025) were associated with non-attendance. The intuition of an association between age and outpatient clinic arrival time was confirmed, thus it is a reality that older patients attend their appointments more frequently and have better punctuality than younger adults. This age effect in outpatient clinics should be considered when developing future simulation models and intervention studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 2 17%
Researcher 2 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 17%
Unspecified 2 17%
Student > Master 1 8%
Other 3 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 5 42%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 17%
Engineering 2 17%
Psychology 1 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 8%
Other 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 December 2018.
All research outputs
#10,405,202
of 13,047,693 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#3,628
of 4,338 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#204,033
of 270,317 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,047,693 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,338 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,317 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them