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Whole-body vibration therapy in children with severe motor disabilities.

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
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1 Facebook page

Readers on

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3 Mendeley
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Title
Whole-body vibration therapy in children with severe motor disabilities.
Published in
Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, January 2015
DOI 10.2340/16501977-1921
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kilebrant S, Braathen G, Emilsson R, Glansén U, Söderpalm AC, Zetterlund B, Westerberg B, Magnusson P, Swolin-Eide D, S Kilebrant, G Braathen, R Emilsson, U Glansén, A Söderpalm, B Zetterlund, B Westerberg, P Magnusson, D Swolin-Eide

Abstract

Objective: To study the effect of whole-body vibration therapy on bone mass, bone turnover and body composition in severely disabled children. Methods: Nineteen non-ambulatory children aged 5.1-16.3 years (6 males, 13 females) with severe motor disabilities participated in an intervention programme with standing exercise on a self-controlled dynamic platform, which included whole-body vibration therapy (vibration, jump and rotation movements). Whole-body vibration therapy was performed at 40-42 Hz, with an oscillation amplitude of 0.2 mm, 5-15 min/treatment, twice/week for 6 months. Bone mass parameters and bone markers were measured at the study start, and after 6 and 12 months. Results: Whole-body vibration therapy was appreciated by the children. Total-body bone mineral density increased during the study period (p < 0.05). Z-scores for total-body bone mineral density ranged from -5.10 to -0.60 at study start and remained unchanged throughout. Approximately 50% of the subjects had increased levels of carboxy-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen and decreased levels of osteocalcin at the start. Body mass index did not change during the intervention period, but had increased by the 12-month follow-up (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Whole-body vibration therapy appeared to be well tolerated by children with severe motor disabilities. Total-body bone mineral density increased after 6 months of whole-body vibration therapy. Higher carboxy-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen and lower osteocalcin values indicated that severely disabled children have a reduced capacity for bone acquisition.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 33%
Unknown 2 67%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 2 67%
Other 1 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 67%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 January 2017.
All research outputs
#1,960,782
of 8,093,786 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
#101
of 459 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,984
of 242,702 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
#9
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,093,786 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 459 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,702 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.