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Palliative care in medical practice: medical students' expectations

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care , April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
20 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
25 Mendeley
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Title
Palliative care in medical practice: medical students' expectations
Published in
BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care , April 2018
DOI 10.1136/bmjspcare-2017-001486
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ruth Diver, Thelma Quince, Stephen Barclay, John Benson, James Brimicombe, Diana Wood, Pia Thiemann

Abstract

During their careers, all doctors will be involved in the care of the dying, and this is likely to increase with current demographic trends. Future doctors need to be well-prepared for this. Little is known about medical students' expectations about providing palliative care. Our aim was to investigate how satisfying students expect palliative care to be, and any attitudes towards palliative care associated with a negative expectation. Fifteen UK medical schools participated in the study, with 1898 first and final year students completing an online questionnaire which investigated how satisfying they expect providing palliative care to be and their attitudes towards palliative care. At both the beginning and end of their training, a significant proportion of students expect palliative care to be less satisfying than other care (19.3% first year, 16% final year). Students expecting palliative care to be less satisfying were more likely to be men, and their attitudes suggest that while they understand the importance of providing palliative care they are concerned about the potential impact of this kind of work on them personally. Medical student education needs to address why palliative care is important and how to deliver it effectively, and the strategies for dealing positively with the impact of this work on future clinicians.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 20%
Researcher 4 16%
Student > Bachelor 4 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 8%
Librarian 2 8%
Other 4 16%
Unknown 4 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 52%
Social Sciences 3 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 4%
Unknown 6 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 May 2018.
All research outputs
#1,222,410
of 17,367,552 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care
#172
of 1,341 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,167
of 286,930 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care
#7
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,367,552 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,341 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,930 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.