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Genome‐Wide Associations of Global Electrical Heterogeneity ECG Phenotype: The ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) Study and CHS (Cardiovascular Health Study)

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the American Heart Association Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, April 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
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5 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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7 Dimensions

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12 Mendeley
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Title
Genome‐Wide Associations of Global Electrical Heterogeneity ECG Phenotype: The ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) Study and CHS (Cardiovascular Health Study)
Published in
Journal of the American Heart Association Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, April 2018
DOI 10.1161/jaha.117.008160
Pubmed ID
Authors

Larisa G. Tereshchenko, Nona Sotoodehnia, Colleen M. Sitlani, Foram N. Ashar, Muammar Kabir, Mary L. Biggs, Michael P. Morley, Jonathan W. Waks, Elsayed Z. Soliman, Alfred E. Buxton, Tor Biering‐Sørensen, Scott D. Solomon, Wendy S. Post, Thomas P. Cappola, David S. Siscovick, Dan E. Arking

Abstract

ECG global electrical heterogeneity (GEH) is associated with sudden cardiac death. We hypothesized that a genome-wide association study would identify genetic loci related to GEH. We tested genotyped and imputed variants in black (N=3057) and white (N=10 769) participants in the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) study and CHS (Cardiovascular Health Study). GEH (QRS-T angle, sum absolute QRST integral, spatial ventricular gradient magnitude, elevation, azimuth) was measured on 12-lead ECGs. Linear regression models were constructed with each GEH variable as an outcome, adjusted for age, sex, height, body mass index, study site, and principal components to account for ancestry. GWAS identified 10 loci that showed genome-wide significant association with GEH in whites or joint ancestry. The strongest signal (rs7301677, nearTBX3) was associated with QRS-T angle (white standardized β+0.16 [95% CI 0.13-0.19];P=1.5×10-26), spatial ventricular gradient elevation (+0.11 [0.08-0.14];P=2.1×10-12), and spatial ventricular gradient magnitude (-0.12 [95% CI -0.15 to -0.09];P=5.9×10-15). Altogether, GEH-SNPs explained 1.1% to 1.6% of GEH variance. Loci on chromosomes 4 (nearHMCN2), 5 (IGF1R), 11 (11p11.2 region cluster), and 7 (nearACTB) are novel ECG phenotype-associated loci. Several loci significantly associated with gene expression in the left ventricle (HMCN2locus-withHMCN2;IGF1Rlocus-withIGF1R), and atria (RP11-481J2.2locus-with expression of a long non-coding RNA andNDRG4). We identified 10 genetic loci associated with ECG GEH. Replication of GEH GWAS findings in independent cohorts is warranted. Further studies of GEH-loci may uncover mechanisms of arrhythmogenic remodeling in response to cardiovascular risk factors.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 25%
Student > Master 3 25%
Researcher 2 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Other 2 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 42%
Unspecified 4 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%
Engineering 1 8%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 April 2018.
All research outputs
#3,505,134
of 12,802,184 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the American Heart Association Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease
#1,531
of 3,094 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,761
of 273,134 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the American Heart Association Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease
#131
of 221 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,802,184 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,094 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.6. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,134 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 221 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.