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Coevolution with Bacteriophages Drives Genome-Wide Host Evolution and Constrains the Acquisition of Abiotic-Beneficial Mutations

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Biology and Evolution, February 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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29 tweeters

Citations

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77 Dimensions

Readers on

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178 Mendeley
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Title
Coevolution with Bacteriophages Drives Genome-Wide Host Evolution and Constrains the Acquisition of Abiotic-Beneficial Mutations
Published in
Molecular Biology and Evolution, February 2015
DOI 10.1093/molbev/msv032
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pauline D. Scanlan, Alex R. Hall, Gordon Blackshields, Ville-P. Friman, Michael R. Davis, Joanna B. Goldberg, Angus Buckling

Abstract

Studies of antagonistic coevolution between hosts and parasites typically focus on resistance and infectivity traits. However, coevolution could also have genome-wide effects on the hosts due to pleiotropy, epistasis or selection for evolvability. Here we investigate these effects in the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 during ~400 generations of evolution in the presence or absence of bacteriophage (coevolution or evolution treatments respectively). Coevolution resulted in variable phage resistance, lower competitive fitness in the absence of phages, and greater genome-wide divergence both from the ancestor and between replicates, in part due to the evolution of increased mutation rates. Hosts from coevolution and evolution treatments had different suites of mutations. A high proportion of mutations observed in coevolved hosts were associated with a known phage target binding site, the Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and correlated with altered LPS length and phage resistance. Mutations in evolved bacteria were correlated with higher fitness in the absence of phages. However, the benefits of these growth-promoting mutations were completely lost when these bacteria were subsequently coevolved with phages, indicating that they were not beneficial in the presence of resistance mutations (consistent with negative epistasis). Our results show that in addition to affecting genome-wide evolution in loci not obviously linked to parasite resistance, coevolution can also constrain the acquisition of mutations beneficial for growth in the abiotic environment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 29 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 178 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Belgium 3 2%
United States 2 1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 171 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 44 25%
Researcher 31 17%
Student > Bachelor 26 15%
Student > Master 25 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 5%
Other 25 14%
Unknown 18 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 92 52%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 34 19%
Immunology and Microbiology 15 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 2%
Engineering 2 1%
Other 8 4%
Unknown 24 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 March 2015.
All research outputs
#1,816,123
of 19,293,994 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Biology and Evolution
#1,110
of 4,576 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#30,464
of 309,308 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Biology and Evolution
#18
of 68 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,293,994 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,576 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 309,308 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 68 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.