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Pathogen-Host Interactions: Antigenic Variation v. Somatic Adaptations

Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 13: Antibody Isotype Switching in Vertebrates.
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Chapter title
Antibody Isotype Switching in Vertebrates.
Chapter number 13
Book title
Pathogen-Host Interactions: Antigenic Variation v. Somatic Adaptations
Published in
Results and problems in cell differentiation, January 2015
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-20819-0_13
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-3-31-920818-3, 978-3-31-920819-0
Authors

Senger, Kate, Hackney, Jason, Payandeh, Jian, Zarrin, Ali A, Kate Senger, Jason Hackney, Jian Payandeh, Ali A. Zarrin

Abstract

The humoral or antibody-mediated immune response in vertebrates has evolved to respond to diverse antigenic challenges in various anatomical locations. Diversification of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) constant region via isotype switching allows for remarkable plasticity in the immune response, including versatile tissue distribution, Fc receptor binding, and complement fixation. This enables antibody molecules to exert various biological functions while maintaining antigen-binding specificity. Different immunoglobulin (Ig) classes include IgM, IgD, IgG, IgE, and IgA, which exist as surface-bound and secreted forms. High-affinity autoantibodies are associated with various autoimmune diseases such as lupus and arthritis, while defects in components of isotype switching are associated with infections. A major route of infection used by a large number of pathogens is invasion of mucosal surfaces within the respiratory, digestive, or urinary tract. Most infections of this nature are initially limited by effector mechanisms such as secretory IgA antibodies. Mucosal surfaces have been proposed as a major site for the genesis of adaptive immune responses, not just in fighting infections but also in tolerating commensals and constant dietary antigens. We will discuss the evolution of isotype switching in various species and provide an overview of the function of various isotypes with a focus on IgA, which is universally important in gut homeostasis as well as pathogen clearance. Finally, we will discuss the utility of antibodies as therapeutic modalities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 21%
Researcher 3 21%
Unspecified 1 7%
Unknown 3 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 4 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 29%
Unspecified 1 7%
Neuroscience 1 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 November 2015.
All research outputs
#5,575,158
of 6,535,212 outputs
Outputs from Results and problems in cell differentiation
#44
of 65 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#167,321
of 210,013 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Results and problems in cell differentiation
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,535,212 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 65 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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