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Clarence Crafoord: a giant in cardiothoracic surgery, the first to repair aortic coarctation.

Overview of attention for article published in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
8 Mendeley
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Title
Clarence Crafoord: a giant in cardiothoracic surgery, the first to repair aortic coarctation.
Published in
The Annals of Thoracic Surgery
DOI 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2008.08.072
Pubmed ID
Abstract

On October 19, 1944, Clarence Crafoord performed the first successful repair of aortic coarctation. The operation was done a year before Robert Gross did his first case (he is often claimed to have been the first). In fact, Gross had read Crafoord's report before he performed his own first operation. Crafoord's achievement was not an isolated event. In the late 1920s he had performed two successful pulmonary embolectomies, in the 1930s he introduced heparin as thrombosis prophylaxis, and in the 1940s he pioneered mechanical positive-pressure ventilation during thoracic operations and worked out a safe and precise technique for pneumonectomy. During the 1950s a string of innovative surgical procedures were done at his unit in Stockholm. These included the second successful case of cardiopulmonary bypass in the world, the first case of atrial repair of transposition of the great arteries, endarterectomy of the left coronary artery, and the first implantation of a pacemaker into a human. In this article we will pay tribute to Clarence Crafoord and describe some of the contributions that he and his collaborators made to the field of cardiothoracic surgery.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 13%
Unknown 7 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 2 25%
Researcher 2 25%
Student > Master 2 25%
Other 1 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 13%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 75%
Engineering 2 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 January 2009.
All research outputs
#817,853
of 3,626,769 outputs
Outputs from The Annals of Thoracic Surgery
#114
of 1,681 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,551
of 94,742 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Annals of Thoracic Surgery
#7
of 98 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,626,769 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 63rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,681 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 94,742 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 98 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.