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The Molecular Biology of Photorhabdus Bacteria

Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 29: Photorhabdus asymbiotica as an Insect and Human Pathogen
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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14 Mendeley
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Chapter title
Photorhabdus asymbiotica as an Insect and Human Pathogen
Chapter number 29
Book title
The Molecular Biology of Photorhabdus Bacteria
Published in
Current topics in microbiology and immunology, January 2016
DOI 10.1007/82_2016_29
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-3-31-952714-7, 978-3-31-952715-4
Authors

Alexia Hapeshi, Nick R. Waterfield

Abstract

Photorhabdus asymbiotica is a species of bacterium that is pathogenic to humans whilst retaining the ability to infect insect hosts. Currently, there are two recognised subspecies, P. asymbiotica subsp. asymbiotica and P. asymbiotica subsp. australis with strains isolated from various locations in the USA, Australia, Thailand, Nepal and Europe. Like other species of Photorhabdus, P. asymbiotica subsp. australis was shown to form a symbiotic relationship with a Heterorhabditis nematode. In contrast to most strains of Photorhabdus luminescens, P. asymbiotica can grow at 37 °C and this is a defining factor in its ability to cause human disease. Insights into other adaptations it has undergone that have enabled host switching to occur have come from whole genome sequencing and transcriptomic studies. P. asymbiotica has a smaller genome compared to P. luminenscens with a lower diversity of insecticidal toxins. However, it has acquired plasmids and several pathogenicity islands in its genome. These encode genes with similarity to effectors or systems found in other known human pathogens such as Salmonella and Yersinia and are therefore likely to contribute to human pathogenicity. Of crucial importance to virulence is the fact that P. asymbiotica undergoes a large metabolic shift at the human host temperature.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 21%
Student > Bachelor 2 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 14%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 7%
Student > Master 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 4 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 7%
Chemistry 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2016.
All research outputs
#7,779,800
of 13,042,533 outputs
Outputs from Current topics in microbiology and immunology
#285
of 543 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#147,525
of 286,300 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current topics in microbiology and immunology
#4
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,042,533 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 543 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,300 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.